FANDOM


IconMoveProtect IconOUAT IconBook IconItem IconStorybrooke IconEF IconS1 IconS2 IconS3 IconS4 IconS5
The Mirror strikes again! I wanted to bring you the latest edition. I assure you it's one of my better hatchet jobs.
Sidney Glass to Regina Mills src

The Storybrooke Daily Mirror is a newspaper on ABC's Once Upon a Time. It first appears in the second episode of the first season.

History

Broom
This article or section needs more history!
You can help out the Once Upon a Time Wiki by updating or adding to the history of this subject. If you need any help, please see our policies.
Reason: Expansion. Need narrative detailed summaries.

During First Curse
The Daily Mirror is used by mayor, Regina, in a smear campaign against Emma to drive her out of town. The previous night Emma had swerved off the road, hitting the Storybrooke sign. Taking advantage of this situation, she has the chief editor, Sidney, write about it in the local newspaper, and claim Emma was intoxicated when she crashed the car. When Regina asks Sidney for an update on any more potential dirt on Emma, but he has been unable to find anything else, so she threatens to dispose him. ("The Thing You Love Most")

During Second Curse

Sitting in the hospital waiting room, Henry looks through the newspaper advertisements while Mary Margaret is going into labor. In a conversation with Archie, the boy explains his intentions of looking for an open apartment listing in Storybrooke for Emma since the loft will be too crowded once David and Mary Margaret's child is born. Later, he finds the perfect apartment and shows the listing to Emma, who still has doubts about staying in town. ("Kansas (Episode)", "Snow Drifts")



After Second Curse
Having broken free from imprisonment inside the urn, Queen Elsa of Arendelle finds herself in a town called Storybrooke. Frightened and alone, she wanders the streets until ducking for cover in a warehouse after realizing two residents, Emma and Hook, are tracking her. Before they can close in on her, Elsa conjures an ice monster to chase them away. As she breathes in relief, a newspaper blows in from the wind. On the front page photo, Elsa recognizes the man, Mr. Gold, and takes the paper with her as she sneaks into his pawnshop by nightfall. ("A Tale of Two Sisters")

Before Third Curse
While Emma leaves on a quest with Merlin, Henry keeps Granny company in the diner. Later on, as he reads the Storybrooke Daily Mirror, his mother returns by herself, wondering where the Sorcerer is. ("Birth")

Front Page Headlines

  • "Stranger Destroys Historic Sign"
  • "Coma Patient Wakes Up"
  • "Welcome Home, John Doe"
  • "Ex-Jailbird"
  • "Heartless!"
  • "Reagan: Marines Will Be Staying In Beirut" (Sunday October 23, 1983; Morning Edition)
  • "Local Paleontologist Gives Lecture On Unusual Fossil"[8]
  • "Mr. Gold To Marry Belle French"
  • "New B&B Regulations"[9]

Characters on the Front Page

Trivia

On-screen Notes

  • The name of the newspaper, Daily Mirror, refers to Sidney's Enchanted Forest counterpart, a genie who seals himself into the Evil Queen's mirror after using his last wish. ("The Thing You Love Most" et al., "Fruit of the Poisonous Tree")
  • Printed on the newspaper in the same section as the price, town name and date, is the tag "Independent and Locally Owned",[10] which is ironic given the paper's non-independence and subjection to Regina's demands before the curse was broken. ("The Thing You Love Most" et al.)
  • During season one, the newspapers do not carry dates. Instead they carry the tag "published daily".[10] ("The Thing You Love Most" et al.)
  • The price of the newspaper has increased from 30¢[11] to 75¢[10] between 1983 and 2011. ("The Thing You Love Most" et al., "Welcome to Storybrooke")
  • The Storybrooke Daily Mirror has a website. ("Red-Handed")

Articles

The Thing You Love Most"
  • The cover story reads (note that the article is just the same block of text repeated three times) reads:[10]


STRANGER DESTROYS HISTORIC SIGN


ALCOHOL INVOLVED

By Michael Wong – staff

Storybrooke, Maine – The "Welcome
to Storybrooke" sign on Route 1 was
demolished this morning shortly
after 3 a.m. when a single car
swerved off the road, colliding with
the sign as it came to rest.
Emma Swan, 28, of Boston was
traveling south of Route 1 when she
lost control of her 1979 Volkswagen
Beetle
beetle and left the roadway,
Storybrooke Sheriff Graham told.
Earlier that evening, Swan was
seen getting into her vehicle visibly
intoxicated, at which it was
suggested to her that she spend the
night in town, rather than attempt
the drive back to Boston.
According to Sheriff Graham, Swan
claims that she was not drunk and
that she swerved to avoid a large wolf
in the road.
Swan was wearing her seatbelt and
was uninjured.
Swan was taken to the Storybrooke
Sheriff's office
where she was treated
and held overnight as a precaution.
The sign sustained about $1,200
worth of damage.
  • Michael Wong worked as an art director on this episode.
  • The part about Emma being recommended to spend the night in Storybrooke as she was about to leave town, refers to a deleted scene from "Pilot", where Graham meets Emma by her car and suggests that she stays at the inn for the night due to Regina's drinks being strong. Emma disagrees and believes she is fine to drive and would pass a breathalyzer test.
  • A newspaper prop auctioned off online in March 2019 reveals that the caption reads "Emma Swan, suspected of damaging Storybrooke's historic signage".[1]
  • The bottom headlines read "Sonnet Hill Orchard Park Apple Trees Threatened by Prune Beetle S[four illegible characters]"[12] and "Crops Decimated by Freak Flood".[13]
  • The newspaper prop which was auctioned off, reveals the bottom articles in their entirety.[1] The first article is one huge mess; it is a mixture of an article about pest insects, and sentences adapted from a real world article about the trial of the Green River Killer, published by Seattle Post-Intelligencer in November 2003.[14] In addition, several text segments are repeated. The following is a transcript of the article, with the excerpts from the Seattle Post-Intelligence article next to it (note that one line has been shrunken down to fit within the table):
ORIGINAL VERSION
SHOW VERSION
/
Sonnet Hill Orchard Park Apple Trees
Threatened by Prune Beetle Scourge

By Alex Burnett
Daily Mail Farming Bureau

Scientists and horticulturalists of
the Northeast are warning farmers
to keep an eye out for incidences of
Prune beetle scourgeand [sic] the pest
has been has been sighted with increasing
frequency in the North East.
Recent changes in climate
through out [sic] the United States has

In his statement read in court
today, Ridgway said he thought the
fact that his murder victims were
prostitutes might enable him to
avoid capture.
In her statement read in court
today, the [sic] she said she thought the



/
seen an increase in the number of
pest native to warmer climes of the
southern States slowly make their
way north.
The most recent threat has been
that of the Prune Beetlew which has
slowly been making its way up the
eastern seaboard from orchards in
Florida. The beetle known to ravage
and [sic] increasing variety of fruit trees,
has recently
"I placed most of the bodies in
groups which I call clusters," he said.
I placed most of the bodies in

/
been spotted by area horticulturalists.
Scientists and horticulturalists of
the Northeast are warning farmers
to keep an eye out for incidences of
Prune beetle scourgeand [sic] the pest
has been has been sighted with increasing
frequency in the North East.
He also said he usually "used a landmark to remember a cluster
and the women I placed there," but on occasion abandoned a
potential cluster because of a
perceived risk associated with the
site he chose.
Recent changes in climate
through out [sic] the United States
haspotential [sic] cluster because of a
perceived risk associated with the
site he chose.
/
been spotted by area horticulturalists.
Scientists and horticulturalists of
the Northeast are warning farmers
to keep an eye out for incidences of
Prune beetle scourgeand [sic] the pest
has been has been sighted with increasing
frequency in the North East.
He also said he usually "used a landmark to remember a cluster
and the women I placed there," but on occasion abandoned a
potential cluster because of a
perceived risk associated with the
site he chose.
Recent changes in climate
through out [sic] the United States has
haspotential [sic] cluster because of a
perceived risk associated with the
site he chose.
The portion of the prepared
statement that dealt with the
specific killings began, "I strangled
Wendy Lee Coffield to death." It went on to the
death of Debra Lynn Bonner, Marcia Faye Chapman, Cynthia Jean Hinds and through
the four dozen names -- some still
unidentified and listed as "Jane Doe,
B-10" or "Jane Doe, B-16."
The portion of the prepared
statement that dealt with the
specific killings began, "I strangled
her to death." It went on to the
death of the oothers [sic] and through
the four dozen names -- some still
unidentified and listed as "Jane Doe,
B-10" or "Jane Doe, B-16."
After Baird read the description of
each death - most including the
phrase, "I picked her up planning to
kill her" - he asked Ridgway whether it
was his true statement.
Ridgway answered, "Yes, it is."
After a Bird [sic] read the description of
each death - most including the
phrase, "I picked her up planning to
kill her" - he asked Mark whether it
was his true statement.
Markanswered, [sic] "Yes, it is."
When all was said and done, he
had been convicted of more
murders than any serial killer in the
nation's history.
When all was said and done, he
had been convicted of more
murders than any serial killer in the

  • Alex Burnett worked as a third assistant director on Season One.
  • The newspaper prop which was auctioned off, reveals that Emma's article mistakenly ends with another segment from the article about the Green River Killer:[1] it ends with "family and friends", which is part of the sentence "At that point, some of the victims' family and friends, as well as some reporters, began sobbing", from the Seattle Post-Intelligencer article.[14]
  • Another unseen article, "Crops Decimated by Freak Flood",[1] is adapted from a real article published on the website of the Canadian Broadcasting Corporation in June 2008[15] (a few lines have been shrunken down to fit within the table):
ORIGINAL VERSION
SHOW VERSION
U.S. Midwest floods wipe out crops,
raise food prices


Crops Decimated by Freak Flood

By Kristin Aji
Surging floodwaters in the U.S.
Midwest headed toward the Mississippi River Monday,
leaving in their wake more than a million hectares of
washed-out corn and soybean crops
and soaring grain prices.
Decatur, IL – Surging floodwaters in the U.S.
Midwest headed toward the Mississippi River Sunday,
leaving in their wake more than a million hectares of
washed-out corn and soybean crops. Grain prices are
soaring as a result.
In early overseas trading in Europe, U.S.
corn prices reached record levels as news emerged that
more than 10 per cent of the corn crop in Iowa has
been washed away by the floods.
In early overseas trading of Asia and the Eurozone, U.S.
corn prices reached record levels as news emerged that

more than 10 per cent of the corn crop in Iowa has
been washed away bu [sic] the catastrophic flooding.
Soybeans were hit even harder, with 20 per
cent of the crop under water so far.
Soybeans were hit even more severely, with 15 per
cent of the crop under water so far.
Cold temperatures in May have also stunted the
growth of crops in Iowa this year, leaving them more
prone to waterlogging and flood damage,
farmers said.
Cold temperatures in May have also stunted the
growth of crops in Iowas [sic] this year, leaving them more
prone to water logging and flood damage, explained a

local farmer.
"In the lean years, we had beautiful crops but they
weren't worth much," corn farmer Dave Timmerman told the
New York Times, "Now, with commodity prices sky high,
Mother Nature is throwing us these curve balls. I'm 42
years old and these are by far the worst crops I've ever

seen." (...)
"In slender times, we had beautiful crops but they
weren't worth much," corn farmer Michael Joy to [sic] the
Iowa Plainsman. "Now, with commodity prices sky high,
the good Lord is thowing [sic] us these curve balls. I'm 62
years old and these are by far the worst crops I've ever

seen in my entire life and that's a long one.
  • "Kristin Aji" is most likely a mistype of Kristin Agi, who worked as a production staff member on "The Price of Gold".
  • Michael Joy worked as a production staff member on the show.
  • The final unseen article is another mixture of sources.[1] The title and the first paragraph are adapted from a notice published in the Ottawa-based newspaper Ottawa Citizen in July 2009.[16] The next two paragraphs contain a description of an unidentified murder. And finally, the last four paragraphs are adapted from the aforementioned article about the Green River Killer:[14]
ORIGINAL ARTICLES
SHOW VERSION
OPP officer
faces
drunk driving
charge



Portland
Police Detective
Suspended For
Drunk Driving


Edward Kitsis
A detective with the
Lanark County Ontario Provincial Police is
facing charges of impaired driving
after he was arrested by a fellow
officer during an investigation
in Montague Township Saturday afternoon. At about
3:55 p.m., a plainclothes detective
arrived at a home on Roger Stevens
Drive to assist with an unrelated
investigation, according to an OPP
press release. An on-duty sergeant
then placed the detective under
arrest for impaired driving. Det.
Const Steve Brown has been charged
with impaired driving. He has
been with the OPP for 15 years.
Portland, MA – A decorated
detective with the Portland Police is
facing charges of impaired driving
after he was arrested by a fellow
officer during an investigation
in Cumberland County, Maine. At about
3:55 p.m., a plainclothes detective
arrived at a home on Roger Stevens
Drive to assist with an unrelated
investigation, according to a Police
Department Press release.





/
Having knocked and received no
answer she entered the apartment
with her pass key knowing her son
was expecting her visit. She left the
food in the refrigerator and decided
to use the toilet before she drove
back to her home in Renton.
It was in the bathroom that she
fond [sic] her daughter in law brutally
murdered and dumped in the bath
tub.
In his statement read in court
today, Ridgway said he thought the
fact that his murder victims were
prostitutes might enable him to
avoid capture.
In her statement read in court
today, the [sic] she said she thought the
fact that his murder victims were
prostitutes might enable him to
avoid capture.
"Most of the time I killed them the
first time that I met them and I do
not have a good memory for their
faces," he said.
He said he thought he could "kill as
many of them as I wanted without
getting caught." He also said he took
jewelry and clothes to get rid of
evidence. "I killed most of them in my house
hear [sic] Military Road and I killed a lot
of them in my truck not far from
where I picked them up. ... I remember
leaving each woman's body in the
place where she was found."
"Most of the time I killed them the
first time that I met them and I do
not have a good memory for their
faces," he said.
He said he thought he could "kill as
many of them as I wanted without
getting caught." He also said he took
jewelry and clothes to get rid of
evidence. "I killed most of them in my house
hear [sic] Military Road and I killed a lot
of them in my truck not far from




"The Price of Gold"
  • The newspaper Emma is reading in the diner shows a photograph of David Nolan in hospital. The main headline (seen upside-down) says "Coma patient wakes up". Another headline says "The 13th zodiac sign?".[17]


"The Shepherd"
  • The cover story on the newspaper says:[18]


WELCOME HOME JOHN DOE!


Storybrooke Daily Mirror

News Staff

STORYBROOKE, MAINE – The as yet,
unidentified man in his early 30's - who
has become known only by the moniker,
John Doe, has finally gone home - directly
to a house right here in Storybrooke.
"It is truly a miracle that he has survived
at all," said hospital volunteer and local
schoolteacher, Mary Margaret Blanchard,
on the day of his initial admittance to the
Storybrooke Hospital. "It has been inter-
esting nursing him back to health and we
al all [sic] so glad he has pulled through. It is
incredible to think how far he has
progressed. Not only is he conscious, but
he now has a whole new life to live."
Details as to the identity of the individual
will be released soon. Several days ago, a
woman claiming to be his estranged wife
made herself known to the Storybrooke
Sheriff's Department
[obscured]
[obscured]
  • The top header of the newspaper says "Comet Marley Makes Debut Appearance".[19] Fittingly enough, the lesson plan on the chalkboard in Mary Margaret's classroom mentions comets and other astronomical objects.[20]
  • One of the headlines reads "Remnants of Seventeenth Century Colonial Settlement Uncovered at Harestock Bridge". Curiously, the caption does not match the headline. It mentions Storybrooke fishermen who are in an uncertain situation after health officials issue a warning about tide contamination.[21]
  • Another headline reads "Lyme Disease: A New Understanding".[19] Lyme disease is an infectious disease transmitted to humans by the bite of infected ticks.
  • There is also a headline about capsaicin,[19] an active component of chili peppers, that produces a sensation of burning in any tissue with which it comes into contact with.
  • Another headline mentions a "Rhododendron Society".[22]
  • A back page article called "Storybrooke Teens Plan Clothing Swap Event for Charity"[23] is adapted from a real article from August 2001 in the online Canadian newspaper Southwestern Ontario.[24] Parts of the article can be glimpsed in the episode, while the rest of it can be seen on a newspaper prop which was auctioned off online in prop page which was auctioned off online in April 2019.[4] The missing text is set in fuchsia:
ORIGINAL VERSION
SHOW VERSION
Kids and teens clothing swap
organized for Elmira









Storybrooke Teens Plan Clothing Swap
Event for Charity

By Kristin Agi
Storybrooke Daily Mirror Lifestyle Editor

STAFF PHOTO
Sheila Millar's children, Greg and Denise Millar, are helping
their mother organize a local swap. "It's all about
sustainability these days", says Denise. Besides, you can
find all these cool retro duds, too.

If you're looking to find a good home for
all the clothes your children and teens have
outgrown and receive new ones in return,
then be sure to check out the upcoming
teen and kids clothing swap.
A clothing swap has been organized for
Saturday, Sept. 10 at the Woolwich Memorial
Centre on Snyder Avenue South in Elmira.
The event is being hosted by Elmira
Community Church.
"This will be the first year we're doing it," said Lisa Vale, who is helping to
organize the swap. We're hoping that if i's
successful, then we'll keep it going."
Anyone from Elmira and the local
area is welcome to participate in the swap.
"The idea is that people will bring in a bag
of clothes or whatever they have that
they've outgrown," said Vale. "We take
that bag, and they go off to the tables and
select what works for them."
Clothes to be exchanged or donated for the
swap should be clean and gently used.
"Without stains or holes," says Vale. "If
there's something that you wouldn't
want to wear or put on your kids, don't
bring it."
The swap is geared toward parents who
have infants and children, as well as
teens.
Vale, who has three children under the
age of 10, got the novel idea for the swap
after hearing about a big one that takes
place in Montreal.
"I know myself and quite a few other
parents were talking and realizing how
expensive September tends to be,
especially with the back-to-school
clothing and shoes that are required," she
said. "So we were hoping to try to find a
find a way of negating that cost for everybody."
If you're looking to find a good home for
all the clothes your children and teens have
outgrown and receive new ones in return,
then be sure to check out the upcoming
teen and kids clothing swap.
A clothing swap has been organized for
Saturday at the Storybrooke Memorial
Center on Central Avenue South in Story-
brooke. The event is being hosted by Story-
brooke Community Church.
"This will be the first year we're doing it," said Sheila Millar, who is helping to
organize the swap. We're hoping that if i's
successful, then we'll keep it going."
Anyone from Storybrooke and the local
area is welcome to participate in the swap.
"The idea is that people will bring in a bag
of clothes or whatever they have that
they've outgrown," said Millar. "We take
that bag, and they go off to the tables and
select what works for them."
Clothes to be exchanged or donated for the
swap should be clean and gently used.
"Without stains or holes," says Millar. "If
there's something that you wouldn't
want to wear or put on your kids, don't
bring it."
The swap is geared toward parents who
have infants and children, as well as those
with teens.
Millar, who has three children under the
age of 10, got the idea for the swap
after hearing about a big one that takes
place in Portland, Maine.
"I know myself and quite a few other
parents were talking and realizing how
expensive September tends to be,
especially with all the back-to-school
clothing and shoes that are required," she
So we were hoping to try to find a
way of negating that cost for everybody.
(...) Items can also be dropped
off at the Woolwich Memorial Centre beginning at
9 a.m. on the day of the swap. (...)
Items for donation can also be dropped
off at the Memorial Centre beginning at
9 a.m. on the day of the swap.
  • Kristin Agi (already mentioned in the section for "The Thing You Love Most") and Sheila Millar both worked as production staff members on "The Price of Gold".
  • Another back page article called "Town plants gardens to absorb storm water"[2] is directly adapted from an article by the same name in The Post-Star,[26] a daily newspaper in Glen Falls, New York. Most of the Daily Mirror's version is unreadable on its own, but if you compare it to the real article, you can see that the content is the same, but names of people and some of the geographical names have been changed for the show. A clear version can be seen in the prop page which was auctioned off, which also reveals a few extra words which are obscured or illegible on-screen (these are set in fuchsia) (note that a couple of lines have been shrunken down to fit within the table):[25]
ORIGINAL VERSION
SHOW VERSION
Town plants
gardens to
absorb storm
water

By JON ALEXANDER

LAKE GEORGE -- Gardens are springing
up around town buildings, as the town is
embracing stormwater mitigation practices.
Gardens on either side of the town Highway
Department office on Gage Road are
designed to consume stormwater from the
building's roof and keep the water from
seeping into the local water table, officials
said.
"We want to contain it on the property,
' [sic] Supervisor Frank McCoy said about the
water. Stormwater mitigation in the Lake George
basin has been at the forefront of
regional environmental discussions for
years. Local environmental groups regularly
criticize the runoff that would be
generated by proposed building projects on Lake
George's shoreline and near the basin's
feeder streams.
McCoy said more catch-gardens will be built
around other town complexes.
"We did the work in-house and we had the
topsoil, so the cost was almost negligible," he
said. "It was a matter of ripping up some
asphalt and planting the gardens."

Town plants
gardens to
absorb storm
water

By Brian Cunningham

STORYBROOKE, ME -- Gardens are springing
up around town buildings, as the town is
embracing storm water mitigation practices.
Gardens on either side of the town Highway
Department office on 11th Avenue are
designed to consume storm water from the
building's roof and keep the water from
seeping into the local water table, officials
said.
"We want to contain it on the property,
' [sic] Supervisor Wayne Power said about the
water. Stormwater mitigation in the Lake Story-
brooke basin has been at the forefront of
regional environmental discussions for
years. Local environmental groups regularly
criticize the runoff that would be
generated by proposed building projects on [obscured]
Storybrooke's shoreline and near [obscured]
feeder streams.
Power said more catch-gardens will be built
around other town complexes.
"We did the work in-house and we had the
topsoil, so the cost was almost negligible," he
said. "It was a matter of ripping up some
asphalt and planting the gardens.

The town asked the Lake Champlain-Lake George Planning Board and the Warren County
Soil and Water Conservation District for
help in the design. Planning Board Environmental
Planner Beth Giles said catch-gardens, in
concert with other lake-side stormwater
mitigation projects like that at the former Gaslight Village, represent a significant
step in sustaining the lake's health.
The town asked the Planning Board and the
Soil and Water Conservation District for
help in the design. Board Environmental
Planner Michael Joy said catch-gardens, in
concert with other lake-side storm water
mitigation projects represent a significant
step in sustaining the lake's health.
The garden is populated with indigenous
plants that traditionally serve as field bird
and butterfly habitats.
"This has been an ongoing effort between
many partners, and we are thrilled to have
done our part to take care of Lake George,"
said Lake George Highway Superintendent
Dan Davis.
Warren County Soil and Water employees
and volunteers from the Lake George
Association joined town highway workers
earlier this month during the planting
process.
The garden is populated with indigenous
plants that traditionally serve as field bird
and butterfly habitats.
"This has been an ongoing effort between
many partners, and we are thrilled to have
done our part to take care of Storybrooke,"
said Lake Storybrooke Highway Superinten-
dent Bill Burd.
Storybrooke County Soil and Water employees
and volunteers from the Lake Storybrooke
Association joined town highway workers
earlier this month during the planting
process.
  • Inside the newspaper, there is an headline which reads "local mining museum falls on hard times".[31]


"Desperate Souls"
  • The newspaper article Henry is reading[32] (half the article can be seen in the episode, while the rest of it can be seen on a newspaper which were auctioned off online in April 2019;[25] the missing text is set in fuchsia) says:


EX-JAILBIRD


EMMA SWAN BIRTHED BABE BEHIND BARS

SIDNEY GLASS
Editor

[photograph]
Documents have surfaced which purport to show Sheriff Office candidate Emma Swan made
a series of "poor choices" when she was a teenager

STORYBROOKE, MAINE – The race for the
position of local sheriff has just gone into
overdrive. The Storybrooke Daily Mirror has
recently come into possession of a number of
controversial documents that purport to shed
an entirely new light onto the character of
Storybrooke’s prospective new law enforce-
ment official, Emma Swan.
Records show that when she was merely a girl
of seventeen, Emma Swan found herself, ironi-
cally, on the wrong side of the law. She was
visiting friends of her foster parents in the
town of Worcester, Massachusetts, it would
prove to be a trip that that Swan would come to
regret. Something that would earn her a
juvenile criminal record.
On the evening of June 16th, 1996, Swan
entered into a local five and dime store to buy a
gossip magazine. Soon thereafter, she was
caught on CCTV video cameras trying to dip
her hand into the purse of another female
customer. The clerk caught sight of her actions
and purportedly called the police depart-
ment. It was soon thereafter that the young
Emma Swan got her first taste of justice.

Please see ➡ Swan behind bars – A5
  • The time and place for Emma's arrest are contradicted in "Tallahassee" and "There's No Place Like Home", which prove Emma was actually arrested in Portland, 2001. She was not arrested for pickpocketing, but for possession of stolen goods, under completely different circumstances than the ones described in the article.
  • There is an article called "Pumpkins Weekends at Storybrooke Farm are seasonal treats for the entire family."[33] It is adapted from selected paragraphs from a real newspaper article from October 2010 (updated in January 2011), from the official website of the Daily Herald,[34] a daily newspaper based in Arlington Heights, Illinois. Again, some of the article can be seen on-screen, while the rest can be seen on the newspaper prop which was auctioned off.[4]

    About the format: Missing text is still set in fuchsia. One paragraph was moved to a different part of the article; it is marked with a yellow background. Note that a few lines have been shrunken down to fit within the table.
ORIGINAL VERSION
SHOW VERSION
Pumpkin Weekends
showcase
fall in all its glory










Pumpkins Weekends at
Storybrooke Farm are
seasonal treats for
the entire family.


[photograph]

A scary Jack O'Lantern, glowing in the dark, at last year's
Halloween Trick or Treat gathering – a high point of Storybrooke
Farm's Pumpkins Festival.

Storybrooke Daily Mirror
News Staff

Sweet as it is,
the fall season is just too short. The brilliant
colors of autumn leaves burst onto the scene
suddenly, only to be whisked away on the next
windy day.
(...) Fortunately, the Fox Valley Park District
makes this glorious season last a little longer
with its annual Pumpkin Weekends at Blackberry
Farm. During every weekend in Octo-
ber plus Columbus Day 11 days in all fall
is in its full glory.

Storybrooke, Maine—Colorful as it is,
the fall season is just too brief. The stunning
colors of autumn leaves burst onto the scene
suddenly, only to be whisked away on the next
windy day.
Fortunately, the Storybrooke Park District
makes this glorious season last a little longer
with its annual Pumpkins Weekends at Story-
brooke Farm. During every weekend in October
plus Columbus Day – 11 days in all – fall
is celebrated in its full glory. Daily shows are 11
a.m. to 4. pm.
Already, the leaf-peepers are on alert,
eager to witness nature's
dazzling transition from green
to gold to orange.
Already, the leaf-peepers are out and about.



The pumpkins are fat and firm. The chilly nights
and football tailgate parties confirm that fall is
here.
You just can't get too much of this, which is
why Pumpkin Weekends were created.
"We used to do a fall festival in October each
year, and it was so popular and well-received
that we expanded the event to include every
weekend," said Sandy Smith, facility supervisor
at Blackberry Farm.
Considering that fall harvests go back to the times
of pioneers when locals would toast another
bountiful growing season Blackberry [sic]
Farm is the perfect setting for this kind of
celebration.
From pioneer days to modern times, the same
sense of community lives on with Pumpkin
Weekends. The kids will delight in the interactive
games and wonderful displays;
adults will feel the tinge of youth, reminiscent of their own childhoods.
The pumpkins are fat and firm. The cold nights
and football tailgate parties confirm that fall is
here.
You just can't get too much of this, which is
why Pumpkin Weekends were created.
"We used to do a fall festival in October each
year, and it was so popular and well-received
that we expanded the event to include every
weekend," said S.B Edwards, facility supervi-
sor at Storybrooke Farm.
Fall harvests go back to the times
of pioneers – when locals would toast another
bountiful growing season – on Storybrooke
Farm is the perfect setting for this kind of
celebration. [sic]
From pioneer days to modern times, the same
sense of community lives on with Pumpkin
Weekends. The kids will delight in the interac-
tive games and exciting displays, while the
adults may very well feel like kids themselves.
"We don't have the powers of Mother Nature,"
said Smith, "but we're doing everything we can to
make this season last just a little bit longer."
/
Each weekend will feature a special theme and
one low admission price ($4), starting with the
Pumpkin Fun Run/Walk on Saturday, Oct. 2,
a noncompetitive, child-friendly stroll
around scenic Lake Gregory, surrounded by the
contrast of shimmering fall colors and
rich evergreens.
Each weekend will feature a special theme and
one low admission price ($4), that includes
unlimited rides on the train, carousel and hay
wagon.



Pumpkin activities are the theme on Oct. 9,
when kids can decorate masks, make
bird feeders from pine cones and
enjoy pumpkin-centric games.
The scarecrows come out on Oct. 16 and 17.
On Oct. 16, staffers will conduct a scarecrow decorating class for families, school
groups and Scout troops.
(...) If you're feeling creative, take a train
ride and visit the pumpkin patch at Blackberry,
purchase your own pumpkin and beautify
your creation right there at the special decorating station.
I suspect most of those pumpkins will be
wearing broad smiles.
If you're feeling creative, take a train
ride and visit the pumpkin patch at Story-
brooke, purchase your own pumpkin and paint
it right there at the special decorating station.
I suspect most of those pumpkins will be
wearing broad smiles when they leave.
/
The fair starts Saturday and, as an added
bonus, opening weekend will include an
antique car show from 11 a.m. to 3.30 pm on
Saturday, featuring street rods, customized cars
and classic automobiles built before 1991.
Pumpkin activities are the theme on Oct. 8,
when kids can decorate Halloween masks, play
pumpkin Bozo buckets, pumpkin ring toss and
other games.
The scarecrows come out on Oct. 15 and 16 –
scarecrows decorated by local families, school
groups and Scout troops will be on display.
Cheris fall while it lasts, because you know
what season is next...

Please see 🠺 Pumpkin Groverove – A10

  • S.B. Edwards worked as a production staff member on "Manhattan".
  • One of the headlines reads "The Placebo Effect".[35]
  • The newspaper also front page headline about cassoulet.[32] This is a casserole originating in the south of France, containing, among other things, white beans.
  • An article seen in the auctioned newspaper prop (which cannot be seen in the actual episode, since the newspaper Henry reads is folded in half) is called "Beetle-killed lumber being used in home construction". It is adapted from the first paragraphs of the article "Beetle-killed wood being used in home construction", a real article published in The Denver Post in September 2011, about beetle kill in Colorado[36] (one line has been shrunken down to fit within the table):
ORIGINAL VERSION
SHOW VERSION
Beetle-killed wood being used in home construction
Beetle-killed lumber being used in home construction
Perry Cadman couldn't drive through the Colorado
mountains anymore without dismay over the
toll the Mountain pine beetle beetle has taken.
[not used]
An epidemic
infestation has claimed about 3 million acres
of lodgepole pine forests in the state, said
Joe Duda, a supervisor for the Colorado
State Forest Service
. But Cadman, chief
operating officer at New Town Builders
in Denver, realized this summer he could do more than
lament the loss. New Town,
supplied by a lumber mill in Montrose, will use
beetle-kill wood to frame the homes it builds.
"We plan to use it in everything we frame going
forward — that is our commitment," Cadman
said.
Colorado imports 95 percent of its
lumber, which doesn’t make sense in a state
with so many dead trees available to harvest,
Cadman said. New Town,
which expects to build about 80 homes this
year, will spend about $2,000 per home on the
Colorado wood, which is comparable in cost to
imported lumber.
Given the smaller size of Colorado's lodgepole
pines, the homebuilder will limit its use to
vertical supports. (...)
STORYBROOKE, MAINE -- An epidemic
infestation has claimed about 3 million acres
of lodgepole pine forests in the state, said
Mark Soperlo, a supervisor for the Story-
brooke Forest Service. But Cunningham, chief
operating officer at Storybrooke Builders,
realized this summer he could do more than
lament the loss. Storybrooke Builders,
supplied by a lumber mill in town, will use
beetle-kill wood to frame the homes it builds.
“We plan to use it in everything we frame going
forward — that is our commitment," Cunning
-ham said.
Storybrooke Mill imports 95 percent of its
lumber, which doesn't make sense in a state
with so many dead trees available to harvest,
Cunningham said. Storybrooke Builders,
which expects to build about 80 homes this
year, will spend about $2,000 per home on the
Maine wood, which is comparable in cost to
imported lumber.
Given the smaller size of Maine's lodgepole
pines, the homebuilder will limit its use to
vertical supports.
  • Mark Soperlo worked as a production staff member on "The Price of Gold". He is also listed as a police officer on a wall plaque at the Hyperion Heights police station in "The Guardian".[37]
  • Since the show often uses names of production staff members in their newspaper props, "Cunningham" is most likely another reference to concept artist Brian Cunningham.
  • Yet another unseen article reads:


Municipal Rose Garden: Gazebo Vandalized

Storybrooke Daily Mirror
News Staff

Storybrooke, Maine -- Vandals have been trashing the Memorial
gazebo in Skylark Rose Garden, and it has local residents worried about
the picturesque spot becoming a hang out for bored teenagers.
The Parks and Recreation Director Cheryl Marion says it's under attack.
Broken glass and garbage was strewn everywhere. However, the Direc-
tor says she's seen a lot worse. Once, we found this gate, completely
ripped off thrown to the ground. She tells it like it is. "I t [sic] called
vandalism and it's completely frustrating.
People are frustrated. Sheila Millar said, "I think this is a beautiful
park." Millar is glad to hear about Marion's effort to keep the complex
clean. He'd [sic] like to see motion sensor lights installed and a neighbor-
hood watch organized to strike out vandalism.
"I think that's a wonderful idea. Anything that can increase the safety of
the town is always beneficial for everybody" said Marion.
The sad part is is [sic] these kids are perfectly comfortable enough to do
these terrible things to other parks. Our job is just trying to make them
not comfortable any more" Marion said. The motion sensor lights are
a first step in trying to combat this problem."
  • The article found among Sheriff Graham's belongings (seen upside-down)[40] is also from the Storybrooke Daily Mirror, as confirmed by an online prop auction.[41] Only the headline can be read in the episode; the rest is too blurry. According to the prop photo, it reads:


GRAHAM ORGANIZES
CHARITY FUNDRAISER


"Compassionate" Sheriff steps in
to help beleaguered animal shelter


CHRIS BUFFETT
News Staff


[photograph]
[two illegible words] Storybrooke Daily Mirror
Storybrooke's own Sheriff Graham has given us a glimpse at what. [sic]

STORYBROOKE, MAINE. –
Around 2,000 people flocked in the
Storybrooke Animal Sanctuary for its
inaugural family fun day last weekend. –
something that may not have come to
passif it were not for an unlikely benefac-
tor: Storybrooke's own Sheriff Graham.
Charity volunteers were delighted with
the turn-out at the action-packed event,
which raised more than $8,000 profit. The
funds will go towards the sanctuary's
running costs.
Kristen Agi said: "It was the best year
we've ever had. Because of how little
money we had left, most of the funds will
go towards paying our bills, but it was
vitally important the day was a success as
we only had a few weeks of funding left.
"The support was amazing, we've had
people ringing us up to say how fantastic a
day it was. The dog display and agility
events were brilliant and there was so
much for all the family to take part in."
There was lots to see on the day, with birds
of prey, ferret racing, reptiles and alpacas.
Entertainment included archery, a bouncy
castle, climbing walls, chain saw wood-
carving and displays from the
Storybrooke Taekwondo Association and the
Storybrooke Dance Academy.
Kristen added, "We'd like to thank
everybody who gave their time."

Graham gives to the critters – A5



"The Stable Boy"
  • In "Hat Trick"[42] and "The Stable Boy",[43] one of the main headlines on the cover says "the science of memory". The headline "remembering" can be glimpsed inside the newspaper in "Hat Trick".[42] This is a subtle reference to the haze the Storybrooke residents live in, with their true identities completely wiped.
  • In "The Stable Boy", the main article (half the newspaper can be seen in the episode, while the rest of it can be seen on a newspaper prop which was auctioned off online in March 2019[44] – the missing text is set in fuchsia) says:[45]


HEARTLESS!

SCHOOL TEACHER JAILED ON MURDER CHARGES

Storybrooke Daily Mirror
News staff

[photograph]
Storybrooke Elementary school teacher Mary Margaret Blanchard was arrested in connection to the
mysterious disappearance of Kathryn Nolan.
Please see ➤ Mary Margaret behind bars – A5

A Storybrooke Elementary School teacher, Mary
Margaret Blanchard, was arrested yesterday and
charged with the murder of Storybrooke resident
Katherine Nolan [sic], according to local law enforce-
ment.
Although the Sheriff's office will not release the
details of the incident, Sheriff Emma Swan says
that they have evidence linking Blanchard to a
violent struggle with Nolan on the night of
Nolan's disappearance. Blanchard is being held at
the Storybrooke Sheriff's and will await trial in
the upcoming weeks.
Blanchard was charged with felony counts of
murder, attempted murder and assault and a
misdemeanor count of criminal possession of a
weapon, Swan said.
She was arraigned in Story-
brooke City Court and processed for holding in
lieu of $500,000 bail.
Although Blanchard's motives remain unclear,
one Storybrooke resident who wishes to remain
anonymous claims that he recently saw
Blanchard and Nolan's husband David kissing
outside of a local diner. David Nolan has been
cooperative with the local law enforcement and while
he has been questioned, Swan insists that he is not
a suspect.
  • Another article reads:
Storybrooke Elementary
Girl is Crowned New
Champion at Regional
Spelling Bee


[photograph]
Neil Westlake

Storybrooke's own Tenaya Wilkins regional win is a pay off for
many evenings spent pouring through the dictionary and
memorizing entries while the rest of her friends would play at
the local park.

Storybrooke Daily Mirror
News staff

STORYBROOKE, MAINE – As it often does, it
came down to just one word for Storybrooke
Elementary's 10 year old "logophile" Tenaya
Wilkins. The word that ultimately got her
through to the sectionals, however, was a
veritable delay chain of letters: antidesptab-
lishmentarism
. She aced it, however,
without breaking a sweat. Accepting her
trophy on the dais, she gave a glowing accolade
to her late grandfather, Stanley, who set her on
course towards a passion for words and the
spelling thereof.
"Words are more than just descriptors -adjec- [sic]
tives, nouns and verbs," Tenaya pointed out. "It
is almost as if they have their own colors and
music; they contain powerful ideas; they
contain emotions and feelings.
Tenaya's teacher, M. Tomlinson, is justifiably
proud of her student's well-earned victory on
Saturday afternoon. "Tenaya is a diligent
young student," she said after the event. "She is
a valuable asset to Storybrooke Elementary
and her classmates. she is a kind and helpful
child and has many friends.


  • Antidisestablishmentarianism is a political position that developed in 19th-century Britain in opposition to Liberal proposals for the disestablishment of the Church of England.
  • Neil Westlake (already mentioned in the section for "The Thing You Love Most") is a graphic designer and production staff member on the show, whose name has appeared on several other props throughout the series:
  • The third article, which can only be seen on the prop newspaper which was auctioned off, reads:


Town Hall behind proposed legislation to
place new user fee on land fill waste


STORYBROOKE, MAINE -- As state regula-
tors decide if an Old Town landfill can more
than triple waste capacity. Mayor Regina
Mills is recommending passage of a bill that
would levy a per-ton fee on waste the landfill
was established to hold
In a Jan 10 letter to the Maine Legislature's
Standing Committee on Environment and
Natural Resources, City adviser D. McLean
said the Mayor recommends a new $4-per-ton
fee of construction and demolition debris
(CDD) put into Storybrooke landfills, along
with a new $3-per-ton fee for any CDD
processing residues. Some landfills less than 6
acres in size would be exempt from fees under
Mills' plan.
The fees have two aims, McLean said; to regu-
late a long unregulated waste type often origi-
nating out-of-state to help Maine fund
approximately $5 million in landfill-related
obligations.
"The Mayor gets it," Duchesne [sic] said. She has
made a policy statement saying that our
landfill resources are for the use of Mainers.


  • The fourth article, which can only be seen on the prop newspaper which was auctioned off, reads:


Storybrooke students to milk cows before sunrise

Storybrooke Daily Mirror
News staff

STORYBROOKE, MAINE -- It's pitch-black early on a Thursday morn-
ing and two Storybrooke Elementary students are waking up to start
their day.
Jeanne and Pamela are awake before 4 a.m. They'll get dressed and go to
get to the Storybrooke Farm in time to milk the cows, as part of their
work experience program.
My alarm goes off at 3.25 a.m., a time where many students are tucked
up in bed," Jeanne said. "It gives me just enough time to get dressed,
pack my backpack and be at the barn."
"I often don't get started with my homework until after 4 p.m. and by
then I am exhausted. We barely have time to eat, let alone come home
and take a shower after milking," Pamela said. Jeanne added that on
many occasions they had to skip their 8 a.m. class so that they could
come home and shower. "If you've never been around someone who has
been milking cows and playing in manure all day, they aren't the person
you want to sit next to in classes all day. We stink," Jeanne said
as Pamela laughed and nodded her head in agreement.
"We don't have a lot of leeway or freedom in our schedule."


  • Storybrooke Farm also appears in a newspaper article on the front page of the Storybrooke Daily Mirror in "Desperate Souls".[32]
  • The prop newspaper which was auctioned off also reveals the fourth article, which was adapted from a real life article published by the Grand Junction-based television station KKCO in January 2012 (note that one line has been shrunken down to fit within the table):[53]


ORIGINAL VERSION
SHOW VERSION
Merit and bravery;
Grand Junction
firefighters
honored
Storybrooke Fire Depart-
ment Honors Volunteer
Firefighter K. Manning
for Outstanding Bravery
By Brian Shlonsky
Storybrooke Daily Mirror
News staff
We often look to firefighters, police and
paramedics to save our lives. But sometimes
t hey [sic] are called on to save each other.
Monday, two heroes from right here in
the Grand Valley were recognized for their service.
We often look to firefighters, police and
paramedics to save our lives. But sometimes
they are called on to save each other.Last
Monday, a hero from right here in Storybrooke
were [sic] recognized for their [sic] service.
Captain Clark Thompson and firefighter Jerome Gardner were each presented with a
medal of merit. The men were honored for their roles in
saving a member of their crew during the White
Hall fire back in September.
Captain K. Manning was presented with a
medal of merit. He was honored for his role in
saving a member of his crew during the Story-
brooke Forest
fire back in September.
They say actions taken during the fire
have been a learning experience for the
entire department. "This being a large scale
fire we definitely learned something, and
over the last several months we've talked
about the event and what we're going
to do in the future so this doesn't
happen again," Thompson said. During the
fire, Thompson and Gardner were putting out
flames when another member of their crew,
Cory Black fell through the floor. He
landed on his back in the basement.
Thompson called a "mayday," alerting
that there was a firefighter in trouble.
Thompson and Gardner then planned a
rescue, and were able to save Black's life.
[not used]
The men say although they are honored, but
they were simply doing their jobs.
K. Manning said although his [sic] honored, he
maintains he was simply doing his job.
"It's an absolute honor to receive this award,
and we're receiving it for doing our job.
It's what we signed up for," Gardner said.
[not used]


  • One of the headlines mentions probiotics, which are microorganisms that are believed to provide health benefits when consumed.
  • The back of the newspaper can be seen on another newspaper prop auctioned off in 2019.[3] The first article on the back page reads:
SEVERE WEATHER
CONTINUES IN
STORYBROOKE

By H. Eshraghi
Storybrooke Weather Center

STORYBROOKE, ME. – The same storm set to
bring a new round of severe weather to parts
of the South this week will bring mostly rain
to the mid-Atlantic, but some snow to north-
ern New England and neighboring Canada
late this week.
Cold air will offer little resistance as the next
storm comes calling later Thursday into
Friday.
The storm will bring rain to the I-95 cities
from Richmond, Va., to Boston, Mass., and
along the Ohio River from Cairo, Ill., to
Pittsburgh, Pa.
At the onset of the storm, a mix of wet snow,
sleet and rain is possible with a coating in
spots from along the southern tier of New
York
and the northern tier of Pennsylvania
through central Massachusetts to coastal
Maine.
From northeastern upstate New York to
northern Maine and interior New Bruns-
wick
, there can be a few inches (up to 15 cm)
of snow. Snowfall will tend to taper off
moving northward over southern Quebec
away from the bulk of the storm's moisture.


  • The main content of the article is a word for word rendition of a real weather forecast published on a Persian forum in October 2011.[54]
  • H. Eshraghi is a reference to Houman Eshraghi, who worked as an art department coordinator on Season One.
  • The second article is adapted from a real article published by Ireland's largest-selling daily newspaper Irish Independent in April 2007[55] (note that a few sentences have been shrunken down to fit within the table):
ORIGINAL VERSION
SHOW VERSION
Molly the top scorer
at whist drive


Storybrooke
Whist Drive

Storybrooke Daily Mirror
News Staff

Molly O'Toole was the top score winner at the
Leskinfare whist Drive on April
10 last. In the ladies section, Mike Doyle and Eilish Murphy shared
first prize. In second place was Nick Furlong, while Anne Roche
was third. The half time winner was Maureen
Evans.
In the gents section, George Stephen's was first,
while Maura Kirwan was second.
Third place went to Tony O'Dowd, while the half-
time winner was Geraldine Doran.
The ticket prizes were won by Violet Bailey, George
Stephens (2), Molloy O'Toole (2), Jenny O'Donnell, Valerie Copeland, Philomena
Lambert and Mina Walsh.
Molly was the top score winner at the
Storybrooke Seniors Whist Drive on January
17 last. In the ladies section, A. Fleming was
first; P. MacDonald was second; and S. Gahan
was third. The half-time winners were: A.
Roche; P. Nolan and E. Murphy
In the gents section, M. Tomkins was first.
M. Cushe was second; and D. Rapple and B.
Roche was third. M. Graham was the half-
time winner.
The ticket prizes were won by: S. Owen,s I.
O'brien [sic]; E. Furlong; E. Hayes; E. Sinnoll; N.
Carter; and S. Gahan.
/
The SWD staff would like to take the oppor-
tunity to thank all those who attended.
  • The third article is adapted from an article published by the Clinton, Connecticut department of Patch Media, an independent news and information platform, in January 2012:[56]
ORIGINAL VERSION
SHOW VERSION
Officials Get Thumbs Up On
Renovation Grant For Town Hall

Applying for the grant was a quick process - and so
was receiving an affirmative answer.

Storybrooke Tech. gets $720,000
grant for "New Makeover"


By Fay Abrahamsson,
Patch Staff







By N. Evans
Storybrooke Daily Mirror Lifestyle Editor

[image]
STAFF PHOTO
The new facade of the newly renovated Storybrooke
Technical Institute is rightly lauded for its Art Deco
Architecture style. A generous grant will also provide
funds for its continuing upkeep.

It was good news during the budget
formulation season when First Selectman
Willie Fritz announced that the town has
received a $200,000 grant for future
renovation work at. The money comes
from the state Commission on Historic
Preservation.
The Storybrooke Technical Institute was
reticently awarded a three-year grant
totaling $720,000 from The Storybrooke
Philanthropy Advisors Society. It was
awarded to improve the look of the build-
ing which has suffered from decades of
underfunding and neglect.
Last October, Fritz and administrative
assistant Mary Schettino. [sic]


Last October, D. Fearn and administrative
assistant M. Soparlo broke all speed
records assembling the grant application in
just days.
They found out about the possible grant
money through Mary Donohue of the Commission on
Historic Preservation just a week shy of its due
date.
They found out about the possible grant
money through the Philanthropy Advisors
Society website – just a week shy of its due
date.
Donohue is the Survey and Grants Direc-
tor for the state Historic Preserva-
tion Office, a division of the Department of
Economic and Community Development.
Donahue was at town
hall for a tour and mentioned to officials
that the building, built in 1938, might be
eligible for the money.
J. Donohue is the Survey and Grants Direc-
tor for the Storybrooke Historic Preserva-
tion Office, a division of the Department of
economic and Community Development.
Donahue was at the Storybrooke Technical
Institute for a tour and mention [sic] to officials
that the building, built in 1938, might be
eligible for the money.
Because of its size, use and age, Clinton
Town Hall needs continual
updating, said Fritz.
In just three short months, the town
was informed that it was the recipient of
$200,000 for town hall.
Because of its size, use and age, Storybrooke
Technical Institute needs continual
updating, said Donahue.
In just three short months, the college
was informed that it was the recipient of
$720,000 for the college coffers.
/
skilled workforce. [sic] This grant will bolster
our efforts as we continue this important
work"
Soparlo was beside herself with excite-
ment. "It's unbelievable how far it's
come," she said. "It was just saved from
the wrecking ball, essentially.
The town's Historic District Commission also
received a grant for $30,000 from
the Commission on Historic Preservation. For a. [sic]





In addition to the funding from The
Storybrooke Philanthropy Advisors
Society, the project has been awarded
more than $165,000 in grants from
various organizations and foundations,
including the Storybrooke Department
of Economic and Community Develop-
ment (SECD).
  • N. Evans is a reference to Nigel Evans, co-art director on three episodes of Season One.
  • M. Soparlo is a reference to Mark Soparlo, a member of the production staff on the show.


"Welcome to Storybrooke"
ORIGINAL VERSION
SHOW VERSION
1983 Beirut barracks bombings




REAGAN: MARINES WILL
BE STAYING IN BEIRUT

Storybrooke Daily Mirror
News staff

(...) two truck bombs
struck separate buildings housing United States
and French military forces—members of the
Multinational Force in Lebanon—killing 299
American and French servicemen. The organization
Islamic Jihad claimed responsibility
for the bombing.



BEIRUT, LEBANON -- A pair of truck bombs
struck separate buildings housing United States
and French military forces–members of the
Multinational Force in Lebanon. At the time of
going to press, at least 161 Americans have
been reported as dead. An undetermined
number of French servicemen are also under-
stood to be among the fatalities.The organiza-
tion Islamic Jihad, has claimed responsibility
for the atrocity.
Suicide bombers detonated each of the truck
bombs. In the attack on the American Marines barracks,
the death toll was 241 American servicemen: 220 Marines,
18 Navy personnel and three Army soldiers, along with
sixty Americans injured,
Suicide bombers detonated each of the truck
bombs. Military sources are already calling the



representing the deadliest single-day death toll for the
United States Marine Corps since the Battle of
Iwo Jima
of World War II, the deadliest single-
day death toll for the United States military
since the first day of the Tet Offensive during
the Vietnam War, and the deadliest single
attack on Americans overseas since World War
II. In addition (...)
attack the deadliest single-day toll for the
United States Marine Corps since the Battle of
Iwo Jima of World War II, the deadliest single
day death toll for the United States military
since the first day of the Tet Offensive during
the Vietnam War, and the deadliest [image ends]
attack on Americans [image ends]
II. In [image ends]
  • Another article on the October 23. front page is called "Shelter Dog Adopted by the Couple that Stole him."[11] It is directly adapted from a real news article from October 2012, from the news section on the official website of WMTW, channel 8,[58] an ABC-affiliated television station, serving the Portland, Maine television market.
ORIGINAL VERSION
SHOW VERSION

Dog adopted by
couple that stole him

Anonymous donor pays adoption fee

BRUNSWICK, Maine – An anonymous
donor has paid for the fee to allow a couple that
had walked off with a beagle from the Coastal
Humane Society to adopt him.
Shadow, a year-and-a-half-old beagle, vanished on
Sept. 21 after he went for a walk with prospective
adopters. He was returned when the couple saw
media coverage that the dog needs treatment for
Lyme disease.

Shelter Dog Adopted by
the Couple that Stole him.

An anonymous donor stepped up to [obscured]
adoption fee

STORYBROOKE, Maine—A[obscured]
donor has paid for the fee to allow [obscured]
had walked off with a beagle from [obscured]</small>
brooke Humane Society to adopt him.
Shadow, a year-and-a-half-old beagle [obscured]
Sept. 21 after he went for a walk with [obscured]
adopters. He was returned [obscured]
media co[obscured]</small>
[image ends]


"Kansas"
  • When Henry is looking at apartments, one of the classified ads says:[59]


Apartment for rent
Two bedroom, two bath,
clocktower views, was a
master woodworker in the
Enchanted Forest so all
cabinets are custom.



SIGN, EMBROIDERY
SCREENING and
Sporting Goods
business for sale in
Storybrooke, owners are
highly motivated $40,000
obo, can be seen on the
web, call Jim at 555-0131.[59]


  • Another ad in "Kansas" mentions a company called Storybrooke Realty,[65] which is also mentioned in two newspaper ads in "Birth".[66]


"A Tale of Two Sisters"
  • The newspaper Elsa reads[67] contains an article about a campaign to encourage people to spend more money in their local Storybrooke shops. It is directly adapted from an article in the British newspaper Hampshire Chronicle, a local newspaper based in Winchester, Hampshire. The original article, which is from June 2014, is called "Bishop's Waltham traders to launch new campaign on July 4" (note that the name of the show's version is off-screen or unreadable), and is about a corresponding, local campaign.[68] Note that half the front page can be seen on-screen, while the rest of it can be seen on a newspaper prop which was put up for auction in March 2019,[69] and a Tumblr post from February 2019, by a winner of another auction.[70] The missing text is set in fuchsia (note that a few lines have been shrunken down to fit within the table):
ORIGINAL VERSION
SHOW VERSION
Bishop's Waltham traders to launch
new campaign on July 4

Bishop's Waltham traders and civic chiefs get ready to launch Totally
Locally on July 4

Storybrooke traders to launch
brand new "local" campaign

Storybrooke traders and civic chiefs get ready to launch 'Total
Local' on Main Street

INDEPENDENT shops in Bishop's Waltham are
launching a ‘Totally Locally’ campaign on July 4.
Designed to embrace local and satellite commu-
nities, the campaign will focus on a core message
– spend locally and regularly in Bishop's Waltham's
wide variety of independent shops rather than
online or in the large chains and supermarkets,
and very quickly, this simple, subtle change will
start to make a huge difference to the local area
and economy.
INDEPENDENT shops in Storybrooke are
launching a ‘Total Local’ campaign next week
Designed to embrace local and satellite commu [sic]
nities, the campaign will focus on a core message
– spend locally and regularly in Storybrooke's
wide variety of independent shops rather than
online or in the large chains and supermarkets
and very quickly, this simple, subtle change
will start to make a huge difference to the local area
and economy.
Emma Bondsfield, of gift shop Luvvit Want
it, said: "Of late, there has been a sea change
of opinion, with people really wanting to
discover what's available around them and return
to traditional core values. With an upsurge in
desire nationally to revive the local high street and
economy to see it buzzing again, bustling and
thriving Bishop’s Waltham is certainly blazing a trail."
Sabine Schoppel, of gift shop Storybrooke
Gifts, said: "Of late, there has been a sea change
of opinion, with people really wanting to
discover what's available around them and return
to traditional core values. With an upsurge in
desire nationally to revive main street and
economy to see it buzzing again, bustling and
thriving Storybrooke is certainly blazing a trail."
The July 4 Independents' Day event and Totally
Locally launch invites shoppers to show
their support for local businesses.
The Total Local launch invites shoppers to show
their support for local businesses.
With late opening until 7pm, there will be a
market in the High Street, a Pimms stand, live music, free tastings,
goodie bags, craft workshops, demonstrations,
free parking after 3pm and discounts of 10-15
per cent in some shops.
With late opening until 7pm, there will be a
market in Main Street, live music, free tastings,
goodie bags, craft workshops, demonstrations,
free parking after 3pm and discounts of 10-15
per cent in some shops.
Totally Locally sets out to change public perception
and shopping habits so that people look forward to
spending money in their local shops instead of
elsewhere. If every adult in Bishop’s Waltham and
surrounding villages spent just £5 with their local
independent shops and businesses, instead of
online or with the big supermarkets, it would be
worth an extra £2.5m to the local economy.
Total Local sets out to change public perception
and shopping habits so that people look forward to spend-
ing money in their local shops instead of
elsewhere. If every adult in Storybrooke and
surrounding area spent just £5 with their local
independent shops and businesses, instead of
online or with the big supermarkets, it would be
worth an extra $1.5m to the local economy.
  • Sabine Schoppel is the art department coordinator on the show.
  • Note that due to an oversight, the last paragraph of the show's version mistakenly refers to money as British pounds instead of dollars.
  • There is also an article called "Volunteers Help rebuild Storybrooke Heritage Trail",[71] which was adapted from a real news article from July 2014, published on the official website of WCSH, a television station in Maine.[72] Some of the text is off-screen, but can be seen on the newspapers props which were auctioned off.[69][70] Again, the missing text is set in fuchsia and a couple of lines have been shrunken down to fit within the table:
ORIGINAL VERSION
SHOW VERSION
Volunteers help build a better
Appalachian Trail
Volunteers help rebuild
Storybrooke Heritage Trail
ELLIOTSVILLE TOWNSHIP, Maine—Visitors from across
the country and throughout the world make the journey to Maine to hike the
Appalachian Trail, and they have volunteers
from just as far a field to thank for the trail's
upkeep.
"If you are hiking, you'd rather not have mud
up to your ankle every step you are taking,"
stated Ron Dobra, a sort of volunteer
district manager for a sixty mile section of the
AT. "You'd rather not be falling
down in this slop."
STORYBROOKE, ME − Visitors from across
the area make the journey to hike the Story-
brooke Heritage Trail, and they have volunteers
from all over town to thank for the trail's
upkeep.
"If you are hiking, you'd rather not have mud
up to your ankle every step you are taking,"
stated Sabine Schoppel, a sort of volunteer
district manager for a ten mile section of the
SHT. "Believe me, you'd rather not be falling
down in this quagmire."
Dobra, who also volunteers to maintain his own
three mile section of trail for the Maine
Appalachian Trail Club, is helping to oversee work
being done by a trail crew on the trail towards
the summit of Barren Mountain.
"These guys are hardening the trail so that it
doesn't wash away anymore than it has," he
Sabine, who also volunteers to maintain her
own mile long section of trail for the Story-
brooke Trail Club, is helping to oversee work
being done by a trail crew on the trail towards
the summit of Storybrooke Point.
"These guys are hardening the trail so that it
doesn't wash away anymore than it has," he [sic]
explained. "A lot of people have never done this
kind of thing at all, and it is tough work up
there."
The trail crew, which consists of a couple paid
seasonal staff and a team of volunteers, will
spend three weeks on this section of trail,
explained. "A lot of people have never done this
kind of thing at all, and it is tough work up
there."
The trail crew, which consist of couple paid
seasonal staff and a team of volunteers, will
spend three weeks on this section of trail,
building steps to keep hikers from having to
trudge through mud.
"It is challenging, but it is really fun,"said crew
leader, Hilary Dees. "I get to sleep outside
every night, so I get paid to camp, first off, and
get paid to work out and do physical labor, and
then this is engineering only without the
degree."
While she gets a small stipend, most of the
volunteers pay their way to Maine and spend
days hard at work to earn their room and board.
"It's my choice and it's what I want to do,"
building steps to keep hikers from having to
trudge through mud.
"It is challenging, but it is really fun,"said crew
leader, Michelle Pitney. "I get to sleep outside
every night, so I get paid to camp, first off, and
get paid to work out and do physical labor, and
then this is engineering only without the
degree."
While she gets a small stipend, most of the
volunteers pay their way to Maine and spend
days hard at work to earn their room and board.
"It's my choice and it's what I want to do,"
stated Maggie Baker, who flew to Maine from
England to help out.
"It kind of is part of pushing myself, and
obviously I do find it quite challenging," she
said. "I'm 58, and I find the physical aspects
of it quite hard to deal with, but that is part of it.
pushing myself."
stated Maggie Baker, who came from across
town to help out.
"It kind of is part of pushing myself and
obviously I do find it quite challenging," she
said. "I'm 58, and I find the physical aspects of
it quite hard to deal with, but that is part of it,
pushing myself.
She has come to the States
nearly half a dozen times
to work on various trail building projects.
This week in the 100 Mile Wilderness is her
first visit to the Pine Tree State.
She has attended the Storybrooke Trail club
fund-raisers nearly half a dozen times in order
to work on various trail building projects. " [sic]


"I actually don't know where I am at the
moment," she admitted. "I have absolutely no
idea."
But what she does know is she enjoys the physi-
cal labor, the scenic beauty and the knowledge
that her work will be appreciated by hikers for
decades to come. (...)
I actually don't know where I am at the
moment," she admitted. "I have absolutely no
idea."
But what she does know is she enjoys the physi-
cal labor, the scenic beauty and the knowledge
that her work will be appreciated by hikers for
decades to come.
  • Michelle Pitney worked as an assistant set decorator on the show.
  • The third headline on the front page reads "Storybrooke Priory's 'laughing' gargoyle has been vandalized", although very little of the article appears on-screen.[67] The remaining text can be seen on the newspapers props which were auctioned off.[69][70] The article is adapted from excerpts from the real-world article "Statues of Jesus, Virgin Mary at New Jersey Churches Vandalized in 'Sicko' Manner, Says Official",[73] published in January 2014 by The Christian Post, a Christian newspaper based in Washington, D.C. Again, the missing text is set in fuchsia:
ORIGINAL VERSION
SHOW VERSION
Statues of Jesus, Virgin Mary at New Jersey Churches
Vandalized in 'Sicko' Manner, Says Official


[image]

A statue of Jesus vandalized by unidentified
attackers last week in Vineland, New Jersey.

By Tyler O'Neil, CP Reporter


Storybrooke Priory's 'laughing'
gargoyle has been vandalized


[image]

Storybrooke Priory's much loved ornament has been found
badly damaged.

Storybrooke Daily Mirror
News Staff

Statues of Biblical figures recently vandalized
at two Catholic churches in Vineland, N.J.,
were done so in such a way that seems to
convey a vicious message, say authorities.
"When you look at how methodical the person
was who did this, cutting off the heads,
gouging out the eyes, there's some kind of
sicko message being communicated," Peter
Feuerherd, director of Communications for
the Catholic Diocese of Camden, told The
Christian Post in an interview on Monday.
(...)
THE FRIENDLY, smiling gargoyle that locals
had christened "Toby" was found broken into
pieces by a man walking his dog along the bluffs
yesterday morning. It was found decapitated.
The head was later found some hours later,
beside the Storybrooke's Elementary dumpsters.







"I cannot imagine what is going through
the mind of a person that would deliber-
ately go deface statues that are dedicated to our savior," Richard
Samson, Deacon of Christ the Good Shepherd Church, told
CBS News.
"I cannot imagine what is going through the
wretched mind of a person who would deliber-
ately go and destroy a statue like this," Mark
Soparlo, Caretaker of Storybrooke Priory, told
the Daily Mirror.
Feuerherd told CP that the police are still investi-
gating the scenes, searching for evidence that
might point to the attacker's identity. "We have
contacted the authorities,
we will prosecute
this to the fullest extent of the law," the spokes-
man declared.
(...)
Soparlo told CP [sic] that the police are still investi-
gating the scene, searching for evidence that
might point to the attacker's identity. "We have
contacted the authorities and I can promise you,
we will prosecute this individual, when we find
him, to the fullest extent of the law," the spokes-
man declared.

  • Interestingly, one of the classified ads in "Birth" is about a house near Storybrooke Priory.[74]
  • The newspapers props that were auctioned off reveal that the lower right hand corner contains a short piece called "Submit your local weather photos for the Meteorological Society exhibition", where readers are encouraged to submit their own weather photos for a local exhibition. The bottom of the page contains a quick look at today's news. Among the news mentioned is a local cannery which will lay off 122 employees, most of them in the Storybrooke area, and "East Storybrooke Lumberjacks Soparlo and Venturi" who "practice speed climbing at The Ultimate Lumberjack Show at the Priory".[69][70]
  • "Venturi" is most likely a reference to illustrator Paolo Venturi, who worked as a concept artist on the show, or art director Greg Venturi. "Soparlo" is most likely another reference to production staff member Mark Soparlo.
  • The newspaper prop pictured on Tumblr reveals an unseen page with several extra articles.[70] The first one is called "Local book store uniquely inspiring" and is adapted from an article published in The Chilliwack Progress (a newspaper published in Chilliwack, British Columbia) in March 2000.[75] Note that the final segment of the show version is the same as the first three segments of the article. Also note that a few lines have been shrunken down to fit within the table:
ORIGINAL VERSION
SHOW VERSION
Shelves
full of dreams

Local bookstore uniquely un-Chapters

By Mark Falkenberg
Staff Writer
Local bookstore
uniquely inspiring

Celebrates its twelfth year in business

Storybrooke Daily Mirror
News Staff
The Bookman can become a bad habit fast and
when it does it doesn't take long for you to
start taking on the store's inspiring smell
of paperbacks and new varnish.
The Storybrooke Book Store has a special way of
drawing people in. Perhaps it’s the inspiring smell
of paperbacks and new varnish. It doesn’t take long
to start becoming a regular.
But Chilliwack's world-class secondhand bookstore
leaves a much deeper and lasting
impression than just bookworm perfume. It's
The store boasts a world-class secondhand section,


a small city of ideas, long rows of shelves spilling
knowledge and dreams and human spirit.
That small city will celebrate its
tenth year in business this year, and owner
David Short looks forward to many more.
a small city of ideas, long rows of shelves spewing
knowledge, human spirit and unlimited fantasies.
The Storybrooke Book Store will celebrate its
twelfth year in business this year, and owners Claire
and John Kalne looks [sic] forward to many more. John
I'm talking to David on a very dreary March
morning, but he sounds as charged and
enthusiastic as if he had just taken his
first plunge into the book business when he
first started a decade back,
is just as enthusiastic as he was years ago when he
first started in the book business a decade ago.



ditching his career as a licensed practical
nurse, he was anything but overconfident, he
assures me. "I jumped into it with fear and
trepidation. I was going from a very secure job to
something entirely unknown. I didn't know if I
could do it. I was extremely nervous ... At some points
I sweated blood." But he followed his dream, and what
John dropped a solid career as a licensed practicio-
ner to take the plunge and can look back with
confidence and this decision. He wasn’t sure if he
could do it in the beginning as it was entirely
unknown to him, but following hs dream is what
has given the store it's [sic] much deserved success.

had been the Book Nook thrived. David gave
it a new name, after a handle he picked up
on book-buying trips around the Lower Mainland.
("People would see me coming and say, 'It's the
book man.' I thought, 'What a great name.'") And
he anticipates continuing to thrive despite the
proliferation of big-box bookstores such as
Chapters which have cut a swath through
family-owned bookstores across the country.
Despite the proliferation of bigbox book stores,
John continues to thrive amongst the competition.







"We're not in the same ballpark; we don't
compete, we complement," David
explains. "These days books go out of print
so rapidly; usually in a year, or two years
down the road. We benefit enormously."
So the rumour that Chilliwack will be the
next location for Chapters doesn't scare him.
"I look forward to it," he says. "It means
more for us.
/
David's daughter Amber Short also looks forward to the store's
future; she's helping usher it in by handling
the Bookman's debut to book lovers around the
world via the Internet.
John's wife also looks forward to the store's bright
future, advertising via the Internet.


Amber is seated at a computer down the hall
and around the corner in a cramped office
stacked floor-to-ceiling with plastic-wrapped
books. They're a kind of test library; Amber
is entering information on each one into an
inventory database.
/
"My goal is to have the whole bookstore
on computer," Amber explains."But that's probably going to take me
the rest of my life.
Her goal is to eventually have the entire bookstore
on the computer which will take many years.

A few weeks back, before meeting her, I
talked to Amber on the phone after
hearing the store could also locate hard-
to-find books just about anywhere in
the world. I ask if she can find
me a first edition copy of James
Ellroy
's My Dark Places, knowing it
would probably take a few weeks to track it
down. Amber calls me back 15 minutes
later: "I've found your book." She gives
me the email address of the bookstore in
New York City where she found the
copy, and two weeks later it shows up in my
post office box.
/
The Internet has been a big-time
blessing for the Bookman, with people all over
the continent finding something they want at
the store through the Net. (…)
Customers will also be able to locate just about any
book in the world. The Internet has been a huge
blooming for the Storybrooke Book Store.

/
The Storybrooke Book Store has a special way of
drawing people in. Perhaps it’s the inspiring smell
of paperbacks and new varnish. It doesn’t take long
to start becoming a regular. The store boasts a
world-class secondhand section. Long rows of
shelves spewing knowledge, human spirit and
unlimited fantasies.
  • The second unseen article is called "Group of 4 rescued from local mountain" and is based on two real world articles. The first half is adapted from an article from February 2014, published in the Maine newspapers The Times Records,[76] and the Sun Journal.[77] The second half is adapted from an article published by the Canadian newspaper Vancouver Sun in December 2013.[78] Note that the final segment of the article is a repeat of a segment from earlier in the article. Again, a few lines have been shrunken down to fit within the table:
ORIGINAL VERSION
SHOW VERSION
Group of Boy Scouts rescued
from Maine mountain



Group of 4 rescued
from local mountain


Storybrooke Daily Mirror
News Staff
Authorities say three Boy Scouts and
two of their adult leaders became stranded on
the side of Black Cap Mountain in Eddington and
were rescued by a group of game wardens,
firefighters and professional climbers.
The Warden Service says that four climbers
lowered the three boys and two adults down the
mountain early Sunday morning after they
they became stranded Saturday night when they
ventured off a trail.
Authorities say six nature study students and
three of their adult leaders became stranded on
the side of Black Cap Mountain in Maine and
were rescued by a group of park rangers,
firefighters and professional climbers.
The Ranger Service says that four climbers
lowered the six boys and three adults down the
mountain early Saturday morning after they
became stranded Friday night when they
ventured out of bounds.
The two Scout leaders went to find the boys
after they didn't return from a hike, but they
also became stranded and called 911
around 7:30 p.m. After the
The three adult leaders went to find the group
after they didn't return from a hike, but they
also became stranded and called after [sic] the

Scouts were found by the game wardens, the
professional climbers lowered them to firefight-
ers waiting at the bottom of the mountain. The
Scouts but [sic] did not require treatment
anything except being cold.
students were found by park rangers, the
professional climbers lowered them to firefight-
ers waiting at the bottom of the mountain. The
students [sic] but did not require treatment for
anything outside being cold.
B.C.: 2 fathers, group of 8 kids rescued after
unplanned night on mountain near Rossland
/
ROSSLAND - The overnight rescue of two fathers and a group
of eight kids from the backcountry of a ski resort
in the West Kootenays should be a warning to
others to stay in bounds unless they have a GPS
tracking device, a search and rescue expert says.
The group – up from Washington State and staying at
one of the adult’s resort properties - spent a
chilly night huddled with rescuers after acciden-
tally going out of bounds on a new portion of
Red Mountain Resort, near Rossland.
The overnight rescue of two fathers and a group
of eight kids from the backcountry of a ski resort
in the West Kootenays should be a warning to
others to stay in bounds unless they have a GPS
tracking device, a search and rescue expert says.
The group - up from Maine State and staying at
one of the adult’s resort properties - spent a
chilly night huddled with rescuers after acciden-
tally going out of bounds on a new portion of
the resort.
"A little bit of a mistake and an accident got
them out of bounds and into trouble," said
Rossland RCMP spokesman Cpl. Dave Johnson.
/
The last of the group, which included children
of various ages, were helicoptered out early
Monday afternoon and all are uninjured and in
good spirits, according to Johnson.
North Shore Search and Rescue manager Tim Jones said if skiers have a GPS
unit, they can then backtrack once they get lost
out of bounds, retracing their steps to safety.
Jones said cellphones may be of help if lost in the back-
country, but pointed to a device like the inReach satellite
communicator as the most reliable option. (…)
The last of the group, which included children
of various ages, were helicoptered out early
Monday afternoon and all are uninjured and in
good spirits, according to authorities.
Search and Rescue said if skiers have a GPS
unit, they can then backtrack once they get lost
out of bounds, retracing their steps to safety.
Cellphones may be of help if lost in the back-
country, but pointed to [sic] a device like a satellite
communicator as the most reliable option.
/
The Ranger Service says that four climbers
lowered the six boys and three adults down the
mountain early Saturday morning after they
became stranded Friday night when they
ventured out of bounds. The three adult leaders
went to find the group
after they didn't return
from a hike, but they
also became stranded and
called 911 around 8:30 PM.
  • Notice how a sentence from one of the paragraphs from the article prop is jumbled up. It reads "…they also became stranded and called after the students were found by park rangers, the professional climbers lowered them to firefighters waiting at the bottom of the mountain." It should have read "… they also became stranded and called 911 around 8:30 PM. After the students were found by the game wardens, the professional climbers lowered them to firefighters waiting at the bottom of the mountain." (The first part of the corrected text does appear in the final segment, which is a repeat of a segment from earlier in the article.)
  • The third one is called "30 seeking new homes after apartment fire" and is adapted from an article published in August 2012 by Guelph Mercury,[79] a daily newspaper published in Guelph, Ontario, which was discontinued in 2016:
ORIGINAL VERSION
SHOW VERSION
Guelph apartment fire
appears accidental,
$500K in damage





30 seeking new homes
after apartment fire

Arrangements have been made
to accommodate the residents

Storybrooke Daily Mirror
News Staff
GUELPH — A fire last week that saw the evacuation of an
eight-storey apartment building appears to have
been started accidentally, officials revealed
Tuesday.
The blaze, which caused an estimated $500,000
in damage to the building at 120 Edinburgh Rd.
S., is still under investigation and fire officials
are still taking witness statements.
A fire last week that saw the evacuation of an
eight-storey apartment building appears to have
been started accidentally, officials revealed
Tuesday.
The blaze, which caused an estimated $500,000
in damage to the building at 120 Edinburgh Rd.
S., is still under investigation and fire officials
are still taking witness statements.
Approximately 120 residents of the building
at Edinburgh Road and Bristol Street stayed at
the Holiday Inn for two nights after the fire, with
others choosing to stay with family or friends.
/
Arrangements have been made to accommodate
the residents living in the penthouse where the
fire began because of extensive damage. All
other residents returned to their homes on
Saturday.
Arrangements have been made to accommodate
the residents living in the penthouse where the
fire began because of extensive damage. All
other residents returned to their homes on
Saturday.
The father of one of the tenants told the Mercury
last week his son and a roommate — who were
both working a night shift — awoke in the late
afternoon to find their apartment on fire and
were able to get out of the unit.
The father of one of the tenants told authorities
last week his son and a roommate — who were
both working a night shift — awoke in the late
afternoon to find their apartment on fire and
were able to get out of the unit.
All other residents of the building were evacu-
ated. Two Guelph Transit buses were provided for
shelter, but most residents chose instead to sit
on the curb and watch firefighters, who used a
ladder truck to reach the penthouse.
All other residents of the building were evacu-
ated. Two transit buses were provided for
shelter, but most residents chose instead to sit
on the curb and watch firefighters, who used a
ladder truck to reach the penthouse.
"We are very thankful no one was seriously injured,"
Fire Chief Shawn Armstrong said in a news release
Tuesday.
/
"It is unfortunate the fire had such a large impact
on the residents of the building, but incidents
like this remind us how important it is to have
working smoke detectors and a fire safety plan.
"It is unfortunate the fire had such a large impact
on the residents of the building, but incidents
like this remind us how important it is to have
working smoke detectors and a fire safety plan.
"We extend our thanks to all of the agencies that
arrived so quickly on the scene to support the victims."
/
The Canadian Red Cross, Victim Services Wellington and
the County of Wellington Social Services staff were all on

scene quickly to provide assistance.


The Red Cross, Victim Services staff were all on
course.

[the rest of the article only consists of multiple repeats of
previous text segments]
  • The last article is called "New budget will reshape priorities" and is based on excerpts from an article by BBC News from February 2010.[80] Note that a couple segments were moved around for the prop version; corresponding segments are marked with identical colors. Once again, a few lines where shrunken down to fit within the table:
ORIGINAL VERSION
SHOW VERSION
US President Barack Obama
unveils 2011 budget plans



New budget will
reshape priorities


Storybrooke Daily Mirror
News Staff
US President Barack Obama has announced a $3.8tn
/
(£2.4tn) budget plan for 2011, which includes
increased spending for job creation, but cuts in
other areas. He also forecast the US deficit would rise to a record
$1.56tn this year.


The plan for the budget for the new year includes
increased spending for job creation, but cuts in
other areas. The US deficit will rise to a record
$1.56 trillion this year.Congress must approve
the budget for the financial year starting on 27
September for it to take effect.
He scrapped plans to send astronauts back to the Moon
and will seek to save $250bn by capping a range of
domestic spending programmes for three years.Congress must approve
the budget for the financial year starting on 1
October for it to take effect.
/
Mr Obama blamed the huge deficit on the decisions
of President George W Bush, previous Congresses and his administration's moves
to prevent an economic collapse.
They blamed the giant deficit on the bad decisions
of previous Congresses and administration's moves
to prevent an economic collapse.
He said that in normal circumstances he would have
worked to cut the deficit immediately, but expensive
steps were need to the economy. Mr Obama urged
lawmakers to follow his lead on reducing "waste
in programmes I care about" and avoid "grandstanding".
He added: "We cannot continue to spend as if deficits
do not matter.
The budget will include more money for scientific
research and more for defence programmes. But it
also looks forward to eliminating waste and
freezing many other domestic programmes.




The budget includes about $100bn of tax incen-
tives designed to lower double-digit unemploy-
ment, including inducements for companies to hire
workers. This will be partially offset by higher taxes
on wealthy Americans earning more than $250,000
a year.
The budget includes about $100bn of tax incen-
tives designed to lower double-digit unemploy-
ment, including inducements for companies to hire
workers. This will be partially offset by higher taxes
on wealthy Americans earning more than $250,000
a year.
The budget also includes more money for educa-
tion, scientific research and defence programmes.
(...)


The budget also includes more money for educa-
tion, scientific research and defence programmes.

[the rest of the article is just a jumbled mess of
repeated sentences from earlier in the article.]
So his $3.8tn budget includes more money for education and scientific
research and more for defence programmes. But it
also looks forward to eliminating waste and
freezing many other domestic programmes.
/


Birth



115 W 10th Ave, Storybrooke
NANTUCKET STYLE HOUSE

One of Storybrooke's
finest heritage homes
awaits you. Completely
renovated throughout,
this house features an
open floor plan, [obscured]ch 10'
cell[obscured] on the main floor
custom cabinetry in the
kitchen, stainless steel
appliances, bamboo hard
wood floors throughout,
limestone, marble and
granite in all baths and
kitchen, custom fp & huge
400 square foot secluded
South facing terrace off
kitchen / dining room.
Professionally landscaped

with sprinkler systems
rock w[obscured] and night
lighting, 2 bedrooms on
2nd floor, master
bedroom can easily
accommodate a King Bed
and has lot of closet
space! 3rd floor addition
allows for full height and
is fully finished for use as
a den, bedroom, office or
combo. There is a
detached single garage
with plenty of room for
storage. Exterior shed
may be used for more
storage.
Open House Saturday 12-5



  • Another property is located near the Storybrooke Heritage Park.[66]
  • Two of the ads, mention a company called Storybrooke Realty,[66] which was also mentioned in a newspaper ad in "Kansas".[61]
  • One ad mentions a property located near Nightingale Village, which was also mentioned on a map of Storybrooke in "Lacey".[64]


Unseen Newspaper Props


LOCAL PALEONTOLOGIST GIVES
LECTURE ON 'UNUSUAL FOSSIL'

TRILOBITE VARIANT FOSSIL FOUND AT STORYBROOKE PRIORY

Storybrooke Daily Mirror

News Staff

A regular evening 'constitutional' for T. [image ends]
turned into the find of a lifetime for thi[image ends]
paleontologist from Storybrooke. He w[image ends]
his dog, Caine, at Storybrooke Priory b[image ends]
where he lives. It was then that he sa[image ends]
and unfamliar shape among the rock [image ends]'
of the bluff. On closer inspection, he [image ends]
was a fossil – but quite unlike any that [image ends]
before. The next morning he sent an [image ends]
[illegible word] to the Storybrooke Museum. [image ends]
"They think we may have a [illegible word / image ends]
[illegible word] trilobite at the [illegible word /image ends]
all exited about that."
The fossil is of a [illegible word / image ends]
[illegible word] that had a [two illegible words / image ends]
[illegible / image ends]
ORIGINAL VERSION
SHOW VERSION
Inn owners ask Rockland for change
in bed and breakfast regulations












NEW B&B REGULATIONS

OWNERS OF HISTORIC PROPERTY
PETITION TOWN HALL FOR CHANGE

Storybrooke Daily Mirror

News Staff

[image]

Nestled deep in the woods of West Storybrooke,
the Storybrooke Manor Inn at the center petition
aimed at changing Bed and Breakfast regulations.

Please see > B&B Regulations – A5

ROCKLAND, Maine — The longtime
owners of a historic inn have asked the city
council to amend bed and breakfast regulations
to allow them to move into an adjoining
historic building they bought last month.
Cheryl Michaelsen and
Mike LaPosta of the Berry
Manor Inn met with Rockland city councilors
Monday evening to propose changes to the bed
and breakfast regulations.
The couple purchased the Talbot Home on Dec.
10 from the nonprofit corporation that
operated it for generations as an assisted living
facility for the elderly. The Talbot Home is
adjacent to the Berry Manor Inn, located
at 81 Talbot Ave.
The existing city regulations governing bed and
breakfast businesses require the owner reside
in the inn. Michaelsen and LaPosta asked the regula-
tion be amended to allow for an owner to live
on a contiguous lot.
The couple want to move into the Talbot Home
and make that their private residence.
"After 16 years of being an innkeeper it would
be nice to have space for our friends and family
to come and visit without giving up guest space.
It also affords us the space to consider bringing
in a live-in innkeeper to help us out with day to
day 24 hour operations,” the couple stated in an email
to councilors on Dec. 24.
The couple asked that the city ordinance also be
changed to allow for up to 14 rooms per lot if
there are multiple buildings on the lot and if it
uses existing buildings. (...)
STORYBROOKE, Maine – The longtime
owners of a historic inn have asked the Mayor's
Office to amend bed and breakfast regulations
to allow them to move into an adjoining
historic building they bought last month.
Cheryl Marion and
Doug McLean of the Story-
brooke Manor Inn met with the town councilors
Monday evening to propose changes to the bed
and breakfast regulations.
The couple purchased the new property on Jan.
10 from the nonprofit organization that
operated it for generations as an assisted living
facility for the elderly. The new property is
adjacent to Storybrooke Manor Inn, located
at 81th Ave.
The existing city regulations governing bed and
breakfast businesses require the owners reside
in the inn. Marion and McLean asked the regula-
tion to be amended to allow for an owner to live
on a contiguous lot.
The couple want to move into the new property
and make that their private residence.
[obscured]
[obscured]
[obscured]
[obscured]
in a live-in innkeeper to help us out with day to
day 24 hour operations,” the couple stated in an email
to councilors on Dec. 24.
The couple asked that the city ordinance also be
changed to allow for up to 14 rooms per lot if
there are multiple buildings on the lot and if it
uses existing buildings.
  • Cheryl Marion is an art director on the show, while Douglas McLean is a production staff member.
  • Another front page article reads:
Vintage Rocking Horse sells
for $11,00 [sic] in Local Auction

[photograph]
The 1907 child's toy is one of only 7 in the entire world

Storybrooke Daily Mirror
News Staff

STORYBROOKE, Maine – Storybrooke Fine
Arts Auctioneers held a 'Memorial of Childhood'
charity auction on Saturday – the proceeds of
which will directly benefit the maternity ward
of Storybrooke General Hospital.
The highest selling item in the catalog was a
1907 American-manufactured Kuhn-Hass
rocking horse that sold for a sum of $11,000.
The highest bidder, who bid by telephone, has
chosen to remain anonymous.
One of only seven models known to still exist, the
elaborately carved and hand-painted child's toy
was made in [illegible name], Maryland, by the Kuhn
[obscured] (...)
[four illegible words] and a [illegible]
nineteenth century French fiddle-playing
skeleton automaton.
  • Notice the glaring misprint in the headline, which claims that the rare toy sold for only 11 dollars, not 11000, as stated in the body of the article.
  • The other articles on the front page, which are only partially readable, are:
  • An article about oil prices, called "Maine Heating Oil Prices Continue Decline".
  • "Cosmetology School Closes", a short article about the fate of a business called the Storybrooke School of Hair Fashions.
  • "District 'Rehires' School Superintendent". The superintendent in question is Neil Westlake, a graphic designer and productions staff member on the show. Westlake's name has appeared on quite a few props throughout the series and he has been listed as:
  • Hügelkultur is a horticulturual technique where a mound constructed from decaying wood debris and other compostable biomass plant materials is planted as a raised bed. Ropa vieja (Spanish for "old clothes") is one of the national dishes of Cuba.
  • A Portland section inside the newspaper contains the following articles (note that they are difficult to read):
  • "Rare Polio-like illness puzzles health officials" ("Researchers cannot find link between more than children who have been hit by paralysis")
  • "Couple stumble upon $6-million treasure trove"
  • "Trials are months away"

Lost

  • In the online list of potential jobs, there is a temporary position as an inventory control specialist for 8 months,[88] a reference to the second Lost number. ("Red-Handed")
  • The newspaper Regina is reading on the morning after the Dark Curse is dated October 23.[11] 23 is the fourth Lost number. ("Welcome to Storybrooke")
  • In "Kansas", one of the classifieds shows the number 16,[89] the fourth Lost number. Another ad contains the number 08.[90]

Popular Culture

Props Notes

Set Dressing

Goofs

  • The front page article Emma's car crash, is just the same block of text repeated three times.[5] ("The Thing You Love Most")
  • Kathryn's first name is misspelled "Katherine" in the Storybrooke Daily Mirror.[98] ("The Stable Boy")
  • In a newspaper article about a campaign to encourage people to spend more money in their local shops, the last paragraph refers to money as British pounds, not dollars. However, another sum correctly uses dollars.[67] ("A Tale of Two Sisters")

Appearances

Note: "Archive" denotes archive footage.

References

  1. 1.0 1.1 1.2 1.3 1.4 1.5 1.6 1.7 Once Upon a Time - Storybrooke Newspaper 'Stranger Destroys Histric [sic] Sign' (3218). iCollector (March 2019). (Photograph)
  2. 2.0 2.1 File:106MissBlanchard.png
  3. 3.0 3.1 3.2 Once Upon a Time - Storybrooke Newspaper (3214). iCollector (2019). (Photograph)
  4. 4.0 4.1 4.2 4.3 ONCE UPON A TIME TV Series Storybrook [sic] Newspaper Emma Swan Prop (S01E03) [sic] (1866). eBay (April 2019). (Photograph) (Note that the eBay auction makes it seem like the page is part of a separate newspaper prop from "Desperate Souls".)
  5. 5.0 5.1 File:102EmmaOnFrontPage.png
  6. File:118EveryTime.png
  7. File:208ShesNot.png
    File:208AsIDo.png
  8. 8.0 8.1 InstagramIcon raphaelsparge. (Raphael Sbarge) March 23, 2014.  Retrieved on June 11, 2019. "#StoryBrookeDaily #WhatArchieReads #onceUponANewspaper #ha!" (archive copy) (larger photo)
  9. 9.0 9.1 9.2 9.3 FlickrIconTemplate meeko_. Storybrooke Daily Mirror (February 1, 2012).  Retrieved on June 11, 2019. "Mr. Gold Pawnbroker & Antiquities Dealer, Disney's Hollywood Studios" (archive copy) (larger photo)

    Lot # : 14 – Storybrook [sic] Newspaper Edition. HiBid (May 31, 2018). (Photograph of entire front page) (Close-up photo of the top of the front page) (Inside of newspaper)
  10. 10.0 10.1 10.2 10.3 File:102EmmaOnFrontPage.png
  11. 11.0 11.1 11.2 11.3 11.4 File:217DailyMirror.png
  12. File:102WhatIAskedForFlipped.png (flipped screenshot)
    File:102WhatIAskedFor.png (original screenshot)
  13. File:102ReginaReading2Flipped.png (flipped screenshot)
    File:102ReginaReading2.png (original screenshot)
  14. 14.0 14.1 14.2 Green River Killer confesses. Seattle Post-Intelligencer (November 4, 2003).

    Note that at the time of March 17, 2019, the website is unavailable to computers in the European Economic Area (EEA), due to the General Data Protection Regulation. For users located in the EEA, visit Internet Archive's back-up copy:
    Green River Killer confesses. Seattle Post-Intelligencer (November 4, 2003). Archived from the original on March 9, 2019.
  15. U.S. Midwest floods wipe out crops, raise food prices. Canadian Broadcasting Corporation (June 16, 2008).
  16. July 27, 2009: The Ottawa Citizen from , • 13. Newspapers.com. Retrieved on March 17, 2019.
  17. File:104ReadingFlipped.png (flipped screenshot)
    File:104Reading.png (original screenshot)
  18. File:106Newspaper.png
    File:106Newspaper2.png
    File:106Newspaper3.png
  19. 19.0 19.1 19.2 File:106Newspaper3.png
  20. File:106YouCant.png
  21. File:106Newspaper.png
  22. File:106HelloDoctorWhale.png
  23. File:106Newspaper.png
    File:106HelloDoctorWhale.png
    File:106MissBlanchard.png
  24. Elmira Independent (August 31, 2011). Kids and teens clothing swap organized for Elmira. Southwestern Ontario.
  25. 25.0 25.1 25.2 ONCE UPON A TIME TV Series Storybrook [sic] Newspaper Emma Swan Prop (S01E03) [sic] (1866). eBay (April 2019). (Photograph) (Note that photograph three and four are from a separate prop page from "The Shepherd")
  26. Alexander, Jon (August 31, 2011). Town plants gardens to absorb storm water. The Post-Star.

    Note that at the time of June 12, 2018, the website is unavailable to computers in the European Economic Area (EEA), due to the General Data Protection Regulation. For users located in the EEA, visit Internet Archive's back-up copy:
    Alexander, Jon (August 31, 2011). Town plants gardens to absorb storm water. The Post-Star. Archived from the original on July 21, 2018.
  27. File:110OneBlack.png
  28. File:213MyFavorite.png
  29. File:421HeroesAndVillainsPaperback.png
  30. File:422NotOnThatList.png
  31. File:106DoctorHuh.png
  32. 32.0 32.1 32.2 File:108IsItALie5.png
  33. File:108IsItALie2.png
    File:108IsItALie3.png
    File:108IsItALie4.png
  34. Long, Jeff (January 31, 2011). Pumpkin Weekends showcase fall in all its glory. Daily Herald.
  35. File:108SidneyWroteIt.png
  36. Svaldi, Aldo (September 27, 2011). Beetle-killed wood being used in home construction. The Denver Post.
  37. File:718FollowWhatever.png
  38. 38.0 38.1 38.2 38.3 File:421BookBlurb.png
  39. Orfanides, Effie (March 17, 2016). Walt Disney World Changes: ‘Once Upon A Time's’ Storybrooke Hopes Leaving Hollywood Studios. Inquisitr.
  40. File:108LookFlipped.png (flipped image)
    File:108Look.png (original image)
    File:108Look2.png (flipped image)
    File:108Look2Flipped.png (original image)
  41. ONCE UPON A TIME TV Sherriff Graham Newspaper Clipping (2073). eBay (June 2019).(Photograph)
  42. 42.0 42.1 42.2 File:117Reading.png
  43. 43.0 43.1 File:118SleptInDays.png
  44. Once Upon a Time - Storybrooke Newspaper 'Heartless' (3212). iCollector (March 2019). (Photograph)
  45. 45.0 45.1 File:118EveryTime.png
    File:118SleptInDays.png
  46. File:107DartMisses.png
  47. File:111Printing.png
  48. File:521StandHere.png
  49. File:522BroughtItWithHim.png
  50. File:714RobinHoodBook.png
  51. File:211ANauticalGuide.PNG
  52. File:422NotOnThatList.png
  53. Shlonsky, Brian (January 16, 2012). Merit and bravery; Grand Junction firefighters honored. KKCO.
  54. اخبار هواشناسی آمریکای شمالی ("North American weather news"). persiantools (October 4, 2011). (Post two)
  55. Molly the top scorer at whist drive. Irish Independent (April 19, 2007).
  56. Abrahamsson, Fay (January 2012, 2012). Officials Get Thumbs Up On Renovation Grant For Town Hall. Patch Media.
  57. 1983 Beirut barracks bombings. Wikipedia (January 20, 2012).

    The episode was filmed at the end of January 2013:
    Gittins, Susan (January 30, 2013). SHOOT: Jamie Dornan & Lana Parrilla Film ONCE UPON A TIME 2×17 Chase in Steveston – Updated. Hollywood North.
  58. Dog adopted by couple that stole him. WMTW, channel 8 (October 4, 2012).

    Note that at the time of July 21, 2018, the website is unavailable to computers in the European Economic Area (EEA), due to the General Data Protection Regulation. For users located in the EEA, visit Internet Archive's back-up copy:
    Dog adopted by couple that stole him. WMTW, channel 8 (October 4, 2012). Archived from the original on July 21, 2018.
  59. 59.0 59.1 59.2 59.3 File:320Advertisements.png
  60. Contact us. Noble & Associates Realty Ltd. Retrieved on July 21, 2018.
  61. 61.0 61.1 File:320Ads.png
  62. File:214IGiveYou.png
  63. File:215AndYoureSure.png
  64. 64.0 64.1 File:219PlacesYouSawIt.png
  65. File:320Ads.png
  66. 66.0 66.1 66.2 66.3 File:508OurFuture.png
  67. 67.0 67.1 67.2 67.3 File:401Newspaper2.png
    File:401Re-readingNewspaper.png
    File:401Re-readingNewspaper2.png
  68. Napier, Andrew (July 23, 2014). Bishop's Waltham traders to launch new campaign on July 4. Hampshire Chronicle.
  69. 69.0 69.1 69.2 69.3 Once Upon a Time - Storybrooke Newspaper 'Mr Gold to Marry Bellle French' Prop (3204). iCollector (March 2019). (photograph) (photograph 2 (upside-down))
  70. 70.0 70.1 70.2 70.3 70.4 Tumblr Nothing more dangerous than an untold story... — Rumbelle Giveaway!! on Tumblr  (screenshot) (photograph / back-up copy)
    Tumblr Nothing more dangerous than an untold story... — on Tumblr  "I'm too tired to transcribe all the articles, but here's a pic of the gargoyle article. I think it's clear enough to read without transcription. / Here's a look at a two-page spread from inside the newspaper, and then another article from the front page:" (screenshot) (photograph / back-up copy) (photograph 2 / back-up copy) (photograph 3 / back-up copy)
  71. File:401Newspaper.png
  72. Goff, Tim (July 8, 2014). Volunteers help build a better Appalachian Trail. WCSH.
  73. O'Neil, Tyler (January 27, 2014). Statues of Jesus, Virgin Mary at New Jersey Churches Vandalized in 'Sicko' Manner, Says Official. The Christian Post.
  74. File:508OurFuture.png
  75. Clipped From The Chilliwack Progress: The Chilliwack Progress (Chilliwack, British Columbia, Canada) 03 Mar 2000, Fri • Page 27. The Chilliwack Progress (March 3, 2000).
    CLIPPED FROM The Chilliwack Progress, Chilliwack, British Columbia, Canada, 03 Mar 2000, Fri • Page 28. The Chilliwack Progress (March 3, 2000).
    The Chilliwack Progress (Chilliwack, British Columbia, Canada) 03 Mar 2000, Fri, Page 27. The Chilliwack Progress (March 3, 2000).
    The Chilliwack Progress (Chilliwack, British Columbia, Canada) 03 Mar 2000, Fri, Page 28. The Chilliwack Progress (March 3, 2000).
  76. Associated Press (February 24, 2018). Group of Boy Scouts rescued from Black Cap. The Times Records.
  77. Associated Press (February 24, 2018). Group of Boy Scouts rescued from Maine mountain. Sun Journal.
  78. Hager, Mike P. (February 24, 2018). B.C.: 2 fathers, group of 8 kids rescued after unplanned night on mountain near Rossland. Vancouver Sun (originally), JoCoSAR Blog. (If you click on the author's name, you are taken to a dead link from the website of the Vancouver Sun, indicating that the original article has been deleted.)
  79. Guelph Mercury (August 29, 2012). Guelph apartment fire appears accidental, $500K in damage. Guelph Mercury Tribune.
  80. US President Barack Obama unveils 2011 budget plans. BBC News (February 1, 2010).
  81. Orfanides, Effie (March 17, 2016). Walt Disney World Changes: ‘Once Upon A Time’s’ Storybrooke Hopes Leaving Hollywood Studios. Inquisitr.
  82. Betts, Stephen (January 6, 2015). Inn owners ask Rockland for change in bed and breakfast regulations. Bangor Daily News.

    Note that at the time of July 21, 2018, the website is unavailable to computers in the European Economic Area (EEA), due to the General Data Protection Regulation. For users located in the EEA, visit Internet Archive's back-up copy:
    Betts, Stephen (January 6, 2015). Inn owners ask Rockland for change in bed and breakfast regulations. Bangor Daily News. Archived from the original on July 21, 2018.
  83. File:107DartMisses.png
  84. File:111Printing.png
  85. File:521StandHere.png
  86. File:522BroughtItWithHim.png
  87. File:714RobinHoodBook.png
  88. File:115BeABikeMessenger.png
  89. File:320Ads.png
  90. File:320Advertisements.png
  91. File:106Newspaper2.png
  92. File:108IsItALie.png
  93. TwitterLogo @SpanishOncers (Once Upon a Time) on Twitter. "Elsa (@GeorginaHaig) with the Storybrooke Mirror." (screenshot) (photograph of prop)
  94. File:401ElsaStopsReadingFlipped.png (flipped screenshot)
    File:401ElsaStopsReading.png (original screenshot)
  95. File:113Booth.png
  96. 96.0 96.1 File:113HangingOn2.png
  97. File:603FollowTheShoe.png
  98. File:118EveryTime.png
  99. File:201Snow!.png
  100. File:202ItMoves3.PNG
  101. File:203TheAgenda.png
  102. File:210WheresArchie.png
  103. File:213Panic2.png
  104. File:220Umbrella.png
  105. File:312Parking.png
  106. File:322LittleFamily.png
  107. File:402DinerLosesPower.png
  108. File:403WeightOfTheWorld.png
  109. File:404GrannysDiner.png
  110. File:408GrannysDiner.png
  111. File:409Fall2.png
  112. File:411GrannysDiner.png
  113. File:412MotherAndSon.png
  114. File:413CoupleSeesCruellaAndMaleficent.png
  115. File:414FindAnything.png
  116. File:419ImGoingAfterGold.png
  117. File:420Storybrooke.png
  118. File:501Floyd.png
  119. File:502Yeah.png
  120. File:505StreetsOfStorybrooke.png
  121. File:511LeavingGrannys.png
  122. File:522RightThingToDo.png
  123. File:523ComingBack2.png
  124. File:602DinerInTheEvening.png
  125. File:606FlyingCarpets.png,
  126. File:610RunningIntoDiner2.png
  127. File:613DinerInTheEvening.png
  128. File:618GrannysDiner.png
  129. File:619OhPlease.png
  130. File:621Archie!.png
  131. File:722BrokeTheCurse.png
  132. File:405LetsJustSay.png
  133. File:420BusServices.png
  134. File:518SomethingsWrong.png

Start a Discussion Discussions about Storybrooke Daily Mirror

  • Emma's Birthday

    51 messages
    • I saw an interview when they explained that Henry wasn't awake until he read the story book. However, they've also refered to Oct 23...
    • It's a tv show, and expecting hard dates from a soft timeline will only give yourself headaches XD writers are human and continuity errors...
Community content is available under CC-BY-SA unless otherwise noted.