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This article is a list page. It lists major and minor entries on a common subject. Please feel free to add any relevant entries and information, but keep the summaries short.

This page lists Once Upon a Time and Once Upon a Time in Wonderland's references to various Disney works.


Once Upon a Time

Show in General

Introduced in "Pilot"

• The seven dwarves are all named after their Disney counterparts. In the original fairytale, the dwarves were unnamed. (Snow White and the Seven Dwarfs, 1937)
Doc wears glasses, just like in the Disney film. (Snow White and the Seven Dwarfs, 1937)
Dopey wears a purple hat, just like in the Disney film. (Snow White and the Seven Dwarfs, 1937)
• Most of the dwarves have traits similar to their Disney counterpart: Doc is kind and fatherly, Dopey never speaks, Grumpy has a sour deposition, Happy is bubbly and bright, Sleepy is drowsy and struggles to stay awake, and Sneezy frequently sneezes. (Snow White and the Seven Dwarfs, 1937)
Sleeping curses, and other curses, can be broken with true love's kiss, a reference to the way the Sleeping Death curse can be broken with love's first kiss in Snow White and the Seven Dwarfs. (In the first edition of the "Snow White" fairytale from 1812, the apple is dislodged from Snow White's throat when one of the prince's servants, angry for having to carry the dead Snow White's coffin wherever the prince goes, strikes the sleeping princess. Beginning with the second edition from 1819, the apple dislodges when a servant accidentally stumbles while carrying the coffin to the prince's castle.)[1] (Snow White and the Seven Dwarfs, 1937)

• This is also a reference to the way Prince Phillip wakes Aurora from the sleeping curse in Sleeping Beauty. (In the Charles Perrault version of "Sleeping Beauty", the prince finds the sleeping princess and, finding himself infatuated with her, falls to his knees, just as the curse breaks.[2] In the Grimm version, the prince stoops down and gives the princess a kiss just as the curse breaks, but doesn't actually wake her from the curse.[3]) (Sleeping Beauty, 1959)

Archie shares his name with Hopper, an actual hopper. (A Bug's Life, 1998)
Jiminy Cricket and his Storybrooke counterpart both carry an umbrella, just like the Disney version of the character. (Pinocchio, 1940)
• The talking Cricket is named after Jiminy Cricket from the film. (Pinocchio, 1940)
• The Fairy with the turquoise hair is called the Blue Fairy like in the film. (Pinocchio, 1940)
Pinocchio's outfit, with the red breeches, the hat with the red feather, and the bow tie, is similar to the one worn in the Disney film (Pinocchio, 1940)
• Archie working as a psychiatrist is a reference to Disney's Pinocchio, where his counterpart Jiminy Cricket serves as a conscience who leads Pinocchio down the right path; similar to the way a psychiatrist sits down with their clients and tries to help them find the right path.[4] (In the novel, the Cricket is a ghost and does not speak much.) (Pinocchio, 1940)


Introduced in "The Thing You Love Most"

• The Magic Mirror takes the form of a face surrounded by a dark background, just like in the animated film. (Snow White and the Seven Dwarfs, 1937)
• The Forbidden Fortress resembles the one in Sleeping Beauty, where Maleficent's domain is called the Forbidden Mountain. (Sleeping Beauty, 1959)
• Maleficent is named after the character from Disney's Sleeping Beauty (in the fairytale, the character is unnamed). (Sleeping Beauty, 1959)
Maleficent's staff is based on the item of the same name from Disney's Sleeping Beauty. (Sleeping Beauty, 1959)
Mary Margaret's loft is full of bird motifs, a reference to the many birds that Snow White interacts with in the Disney film. (Snow White and the Seven Dwarfs, 1937)
• There are two small roe deer figurines in Mary Margaret's loft, a reference to Bambi. The first one is blue and is seen next to Mary Margaret's radio in "The Thing You Love Most"[6] and "Snow Falls",[7] on a small table in "The Price of Gold"[8] and "The Heart Is a Lonely Hunter" (see the picture below), and on a different table in "Heart of Darkness" (see the pictures below). The second one first appears on a shelf in "Heart of Darkness",[9] before moving to a kitchen shelf in Season Two.[10] (Bambi, 1942)
• They are also a reference to the two roe deer that Snow White interacts with in Snow White and the Seven Dwarfs. (Snow White and the Seven Dwarfs, 1937)
• A planter with two bluebirds singing on a log, sits on Mary Margaret's shelf; mirroring the bluebirds singing on the rafters in the animated movie. (Snow White and the Seven Dwarfs, 1937)


Introduced in "The Price of Gold"

Mary Margaret has a sugar bowl with a blue bird on top, a reference to the bluebirds in Snow White and the Seven Dwarfs.[11] (Snow White and the Seven Dwarfs, 1937)
• There is a sculpted rabbit utensil holder in the kitchen area of Mary Margaret's loft, a reference to the rabbits that Snow White interacts with in the Disney film. (Snow White and the Seven Dwarfs, 1937)


Introduced in "The Shepherd"

• A Mickey Mouse telephone is sitting in a case in Mr. Gold's pawnshop in "The Shepherd",[12] "Desperate Souls",[13] "The Return",[14] "The Stranger",[15] "An Apple Red as Blood",[16] "We Are Both"[17] and "The Crocodile".[18] (Steamboat Willie, 1928)


Introduced in "True North"

• The dwarf pick axes are based on the items on the same name from the Disney film. (Snow White and the Seven Dwarfs, 1937)


Introduced in "Skin Deep"

Belle is named after the same character from the film. Belle's father is called Maurice as in the film (although he is never referred to by his real name on-screen; the name Maurice comes from the episode press releases[19]). (Beauty and the Beast, 1991)
• Belle's beloved book, Her Handsome Hero, has a blue binding, a reference to the blue book her counterpart is reading in her introduction scene in the Disney film.[20] (Beauty and the Beast, 1991)
• The chipped tea cup is a reference to Chip from the Disney film. (Beauty and the Beast, 1991)
• The blue and white dress Belle wears when she's Rumplestiltskin's maid (also seen on the Shadow when he's masquerading as Belle in Neverland), is similar to Belle's outfit in the Disney film.[20] (Beauty and the Beast, 1991)
• In Rumplestiltskin's castle, there is a kind of fur with horns which resembles Disney's Beast. (Beauty and the Beast, 1991)
• There is a candlestick and clock in Rumplestiltskin's castle resembling Lumiere and Cogsworth.[20] (Beauty and the Beast, 1991)
• A hammer resembling Thor's Mjølnir[20] is sitting on a pedestal in the Dark One's castle. After the first curse is broken, it is hidden inside a cupboard (as seen in "The Heart of the Truest Believer" and "Quite a Common Fairy"). (Thor, 2011)
Once Upon a Time starring cast member Josh Dallas portrayed the Asgardian warrior Fandral in this movie (the role was re-cast for its 2013 sequel).


Introduced in "Heart of Darkness"

• In the Blanchard loft, there are two framed pictures of small brown birds, one of which is nesting. This is a reference to the small brown birds that Snow White interacts with in the Disney film. (Snow White and the Seven Dwarfs, 1937)


Introduced in "The Stranger"

Henry has a Tron: Legacy lunchbox in "The Stranger",[21] "Going Home",[22] "Greenbacks",[23] "Wake Up Call"[24] and "Is This Henry Mills?".[25] Show creators Adam Horowitz and Edward Kitsis wrote the screenplay for this movie. (Tron: Legacy, 2010)


Introduced in "Broken"

• The prince and princess are named Philip and Aurora, just like in Disney's Sleeping Beauty. (In the original fairytale by Charles Perrault, the characters are unnamed. In the Grimm version, the princess is known as Briar Rose, while the prince remains unnamed.) (Sleeping Beauty, 1959)
Mulan carries a sword, just like in Disney's Mulan (in the Ballad of Mulan, there is no mention of the titular character carrying any weapons). (Mulan, 1998)


Introduced in "We Are Both"

Regina's spell book is a reference to the queen's spell books from the Disney film. (Snow White and the Seven Dwarfs, 1937)


Introduced in "The Crocodile"

Smee's hat is red as it is in Disney's Peter Pan.[26] The same thing goes for his Wish Realm counterpart. (Peter Pan, 1953)


Introduced in "Second Star to the Right"

• As seen in "Second Star to the Right", "Dark Hollow", "Save Henry" and "The New Neverland", John Darling wears black spectacles, just like in the Disney film Peter Pan. (Peter Pan, 1953)


Introduced in "Quite a Common Fairy"

Tinker Bell wears a similar costume to the animated version in the Disney animated movie. (Peter Pan, 1953)


Introduced in "Ariel"

• The names of Ariel (and her Wish Realm counterpart), Prince Eric, Ursula the deity and Ursula the sea witch all come from the Disney animated version of the story, since in the original fairytale, the characters are unnamed. (The Little Mermaid, 1989)
• Ariel's (and her Wish Realm counterpart's) distinctive look, with the red hair, bluish-green tail, and lavender bikini top, is based on the Disney film. (The Little Mermaid, 1989)


Introduced in "Dark Hollow"

• There is a hidden Mickey Mouse head on the side of Pandora's Box and its Underworld counterpart. (Steamboat Willie, 1928)


Introduced in "The Jolly Roger"

Black Beard's clothing and appearance is reminiscent of Disney's Captain Hook. (Peter Pan, 1953)


Introduced in "Heroes and Villains"

Cruella De Vil's hairstyle and clothes are similar to her Disney animated counterpart. The same thing goes for her Wish Realm counterpart. (One Hundred and One Dalmatians, 1961)


Introduced in "Darkness on the Edge of Town"

• The license plate of Cruella's second and third car is DEV IL. This is a reference to the Disney live-action film 101 Dalmatians, featuring Glenn Close as Cruella De Vil. (101 Dalmatians, 1996)


Introduced in "Dark Waters"

• The design of the Nautilus is heavily similar to its design from the Disney film 20,000 Leagues Under the Sea. (20,000 Leagues Under the Sea, 1954)


Season One

Season One in General

• As first seen in "That Still Small Voice",[27] there is a ceramic teapot with owls on it on Mary Margaret kitchen counter, a reference to the owl that Snow White runs into while feeling into the forest in the Disney film. It can be glimpsed in "That Still Small Voice",[27] "The Shepherd"[28] and "7:15 A.M.",[29] and is used by Mary Margaret in "The Heart Is a Lonely Hunter" (see the pictures below). (Snow White and the Seven Dwarfs, 1937)


"Pilot"

See this list for special references introduced in this episode, which apply to the show in general.
See this list for special references introduced in this episode which apply to the show and its spin-off in general.
Snow White is awakened by a kiss from Prince Charming. (This element was added for the Disney film and does not originate in the fairytale. In the first edition of the "Snow White" fairytale from 1812, the apple is dislodged from Snow White's throat when one of the prince's servants, angry for having to carry the dead Snow White's coffin wherever the prince goes, strikes the sleeping princess. Beginning with the second edition from 1819, the apple dislodges when a servant accidentally stumbles while carrying the coffin to the prince's castle.[1]) (Snow White and the Seven Dwarfs, 1937)
Emma wishes on a candle shaped like a blue star, an allusion to the scene in Pinocchio, in which Geppetto wishes on a blue star and his wish is granted by the Blue Fairy. (Pinocchio, 1940)
• As Emma's car passes into town, a lawn pinwheel of Disney's Tinker Bell spins in the wind. (Peter Pan, 1953)
• Archie is heard whistling the song "Give a Little Whistle" as he walks away from Emma and Henry. (Pinocchio, 1940)
• Snow White attracts a blue bird that flies onto her hand. Mary Margaret sets free a blue bird from her hands into its nest house. (Snow White and the Seven Dwarfs, 1937)
• There is a plush of Minnie Mouse in Emma's baby room at the castle.[30] (Steamboat Willie, 1928)
Pinocchio plays with a wooden whale; a nod to Monstro the Whale. (Pinocchio, 1940)
Leroy whistles, "Heigh-Ho" when he sees Emma in jail. (Snow White and the Seven Dwarfs, 1937)


"The Thing You Love Most"

See this list for special references introduced in this episode, which apply to the show in general.
Maleficent is wearing a purple dress. In the animated film, her outfit is black and purple. Her black hair ornament is reminiscent of the black horns on her headgear in the animated film. (Sleeping Beauty, 1959)
• Maleficent has a pet unicorn. In Sleeping Beauty, she has a pet raven named Diablo. (Sleeping Beauty, 1959)
• The Gnome, who is turned into stone by the Evil Queen, has a similar characteristic and behavior to Creeper, the Horned King's lackey. (The Black Cauldron, 1985)


"Snow Falls"

Mary Margaret has a ceramic blue bird figurine on her nightstand. This is a reference to the bluebirds in Snow White and the Seven Dwarfs.[31] (Snow White and the Seven Dwarfs, 1937)


"The Price of Gold"

See this list for special references introduced in this episode, which apply to the show in general.
• One of Cinderella's stepsisters wears a pink dress for the ball, while the other one wears a yellow dress, just like Anastasia and Drizella in the Disney film. Cinderella's stepmother wears a blue dress for the ball, just like Lady Tremaine in the film. (Cinderella, 1950)
• Cinderella's ball gown is similar to the one she wears in the Disney film. (Cinderella, 1950)
• When Cinderella and Prince Thomas kiss, it's similar to the scene where the titular character and the prince spend private time together outside and are about to kiss, but then the clock begins to strike midnight. (Cinderella, 1950)
• A Minnie Mouse figurine is seen in the pawnshop when Ashley breaks in. (Steamboat Willie, 1928)
Prince Charming says that Snow White sends messages via bluebirds, a reference to the bluebirds that the character interacts with in the Disney movie. (Snow White and the Seven Dwarfs, 1937)


"That Still Small Voice"

See this list for special references introduced in this episode, which apply to the season in general.
Martin and Myrna physically resemble (through costumes, and Myrna's hairstyle) the characters Honest John and Gideon respectively from the film. They are also con artists, just like the characters in the film. (Pinocchio, 1940)


"The Shepherd"

See this list for special references introduced in this episode, which apply to the show in general.
• The seven dwarves' drinking steins, which are seen in Mr. Gold's pawnshop (this is confirmed in "And Straight On 'Til Morning"), are similar to the one seen in the dwarves' cottage in the Disney film. (Snow White and the Seven Dwarfs, 1937)
• A tea set with with a rose design, with cups, teapot (it is actually a coffee pot,[32] but the angle makes it look like a teapot), creamer and sugar bowl, is seen in Mr. Gold's pawnshop. This is a reference to the magical rose from Beauty and the Beast, and the scene where the living teacup and teapot (Chip and Mrs. Potts) bring Belle some tea, accompanied by a living sugar bowl and a living creamer. (Beauty and the Beast, 1991)


"The Heart Is a Lonely Hunter"

Mary Margaret pours herself a cup of tea from a ceramic teapot with owls on it. In the animated movie, Snow White runs into an owl while fleeing through the forest, after the Huntsman lets her go. (Snow White and the Seven Dwarfs, 1937)
• When Mary Margaret makes herself some tea, she closes her fingers around a ceramic blue bird on top of the sugar bowl, a reference to the bluebird that sits on her hand in the Disney film. (Snow White and the Seven Dwarfs, 1937)
• The Evil Queen sends the Huntsman out to kill Snow White and bring her heart as proof of death but he gives her the heart of a stag instead (in the fairytale, she orders him to bring back her lungs and liver and the huntsman presents the queen with the lungs and liver of a wild boar to fake Snow White's death). This is a reference to the Disney movie, where the queen demands that the huntsman returns with Snow White's heart in a jeweled box as proof of the deed, and the huntsman brings back a pig's heart instead. (Snow White and the Seven Dwarfs, 1937)
• There are giant sea shells in Mary Margaret's classroom, which is a reference to The Little Mermaid.[11] (The Little Mermaid, 1989)
• Regina's heart caskets are similar to the one the Evil Queen has in the Disney film. (Snow White and the Seven Dwarfs, 1937)


"Desperate Souls"

• According to a piece of paper in the box of belongings, Sheriff Graham's full name is Graham Humbert. In the Disney film, the Huntsman's name is Humbert as well. (Snow White and the Seven Dwarfs, 1937)


"7:15 A.M."

Prince Charming sends Snow White a message via a carrier pigeon, a reference to the scene where Disney's Snow White sends the Prince an airborne kiss via a blushing pigeon in the animated film. (Snow White and the Seven Dwarfs, 1937)


"True North"

See this list for special references introduced in this episode, which apply to the show in general.
• A Minnie Mouse figurine can be glimpsed in the pawnshop as Mr. Gold explains to Emma about his extensive records.[33] (Steamboat Willie, 1928)


"Fruit of the Poisonous Tree"

• The genie allows the owner of the lamp to be granted three wishes (in the fairytale, the genie is merely bound to do the bidding of the person holding the lamp). ((Aladdin, 1992)
• The genie states, "You cannot wish for life, nor death. You cannot wish for love." This is a reference to Disney's Aladdin, where the Genie states that a wish cannot be used to kill anybody, make someone fall in love, or bring people back from the dead. (Aladdin, 1992)
• The bracelets worn by the genies are from Disney's Aladdin. When the genie is set free, his bracelets fall off, just like in the movie. (Aladdin, 1992)


"Skin Deep"

See this list for special references introduced in this episode, which apply to the show in general.
• This episode features Gaston from the movie Beauty and the Beast. (Beauty and the Beast, 1991)
• In Maurice's castle, Belle is standing in the background, holding a blue book close to her chest, mirroring a segment in the Disney film. (Beauty and the Beast, 1991)
• Belle's yellow dress is similar to the one she wears in the Disney film. (Beauty and the Beast, 1991)
Rumplestiltskin says to Maurice's court that he can protect their "little town", a reference to the song Belle from the Disney film, which opens with "Little town, it's a quiet village / Every day like the one before / Little town, full of little people / Waking up to say". (Beauty and the Beast, 1991)
• The segment where Belle serves Rumplestiltskin tea is a reference to the scene where Chip and Mrs. Potts bring Belle some tea in the movie. The tea set with the cups, teapot, creamer and a lidded sugar bowl mirror the scene in the movie, where Chip and Mrs. Potts are accompanied by a living, lidded sugar bowl and a living creamer. (Beauty and the Beast, 1991)
• Similarly, when the Evil Queen visits Rumplestiltskin, he has a tea set with cups, teapot and a lidded sugar bowl laid out on the table. (Beauty and the Beast, 1991)
• The teapot on the tray is a reference to Mrs. Potts. (Beauty and the Beast, 1991)
• The outfit worn by Gaston when he confronts Rumplestiltskin is similar to the one he wears in the Disney film. (Beauty and the Beast, 1991)
• Rumplestiltskin turns Gaston into a rose, giving it to Belle, saying that he had bought it from an old woman selling roses, a reference to the enchantress and the magical rose from the movie. (Beauty and the Beast, 1991)
• Belle does not want to marry Gaston, just like in the movie. (Beauty and the Beast, 1991)
• When Belle goes to town to fetch straw for Rumplestiltskin, she is carrying a basket, just like the character does when she is introduced in the Disney film. (Beauty and the Beast, 1991)
• When Belle is imprisoned in the dungeon, a teapot and the chipped cup are sitting on a tray next to her; a reference to Chip and his mother Mrs. Potts. (Beauty and the Beast, 1991)
• In the castle, there is a hat which resembles the Sorcerer's hat in Disney's "The Sorcerer's Apprentice" segment in Fantasia. (Fantasia, 1940)


"What Happened to Frederick"

Regina gives Henry a game called Space Paranoids, which was created by Kevin Flynn, the protagonist of the Tron film. (Tron, 1982)
Emma alludes to Kevin Flynn by quoting his advice to Henry while he is playing the game, "It's all in the wrists." (Tron, 1982)


"Dreamy"

Bossy says that dwarves love to work and even whistle while they do it, a reference to the song "Whistle While You Work". (Snow White and the Seven Dwarfs, 1937)
Grumpy and Leroy both whistle the song, "Heigh-Ho". (Snow White and the Seven Dwarfs, 1937)
• The dwarves mine for diamonds, just like in the Disney film (in the fairytale, they mine for gold, or gold and something else, depending on the exact edition[34]). (Snow White and the Seven Dwarfs, 1937)
• Sister Astrid says to Leroy, "Someone once told me, you can do anything as long as you can dream it", a paraphrase of a quote (wrongly) attributed to Walt Disney, "If you can dream it, you can do it." (Walt Disney never actually said this; the phrase was coined by a Disney employee for the Horizons ride at the Epcot theme park at Disney World.)[35]
• The seven dwarves' drinking steins are similar to the one seen in the dwarves' cottage in the Disney film. (Snow White and the Seven Dwarfs, 1937)
• Astrid gives Leroy a pie to thank him for selling candles to help the convent. Snow White bakes Grumpy a pie in the film. (Snow White and the Seven Dwarfs, 1937)
• The dwarves's names are carved into their beds, just like in the Disney film. (Snow White and the Seven Dwarfs, 1937)


"Heart of Darkness"

See this list for special references introduced in this episode, which apply to the show in general.
Snow White hums "With a Smile and a Song". (Snow White and the Seven Dwarfs, 1937)
• Snow White wears a similar looking red bow hairband as her Disney character adaptation. (Snow White and the Seven Dwarfs, 1937)
• A blue bird lands on Snow White's hand, just like in the movie. (Snow White and the Seven Dwarfs, 1937)
• The seven dwarves' drinking steins are similar to the one seen in the dwarves' cottage in the Disney film. (Snow White and the Seven Dwarfs, 1937)
• On Mary Margaret's nightstand, there is a bird figurine similar to the bluebirds that Snow White interacts with in the Disney film. (Snow White and the Seven Dwarfs, 1937)
• Snow White says that her pick ax from the dwarf mines is strong enough to cut a diamond. In the Disney film, the seven dwarves mine for diamonds (in the "Snow White" fairytale, they mine for gold, or gold and something else, depending on the exact edition[34]). (Snow White and the Seven Dwarfs, 1937)


"Hat Trick"

• The Evil Queen transforms into a hag to lure in Jefferson's daughter, Grace; much like how the Evil Queen transformed into a hag selling apples to Snow White in the Disney film (in the fairytale, the queen merely disguises herself as an old woman). (Snow White and the Seven Dwarfs, 1937)


"The Stable Boy"

• Young Snow White wears several bow hairbands; among them a blue bow as in the Disney film. (Snow White and the Seven Dwarfs, 1937)


"The Stranger"

See this list for special references introduced in this episode, which apply to the show in general.
• The creature which chases Geppetto and Pinocchio is Monstro the whale from Disney's Pinocchio (in the novel, the creature is known as the terrible Dog-fish – spelled with a capital letter and a hyphen in the Italian novel). (Pinocchio, 1940)
• Geppetto has a cuckoo clock in his workshop, just like in Disney's Pinocchio. (Pinocchio, 1940)
• Pinocchio plays with a wooden whale; a nod to Monstro the whale. (Pinocchio, 1940)
• There is a Bambi plush toy in Emma's nursery room. (Bambi, 1942)
• It is also a reference to the roe deer that Emma's mother Snow White interacts with in Snow White and the Seven Dwarfs. (Snow White and the Seven Dwarfs, 1937)
• A Minnie Mouse is sitting on a shelf in Emma's nursery room.[36] (Steamboat Willie, 1928)


"An Apple Red as Blood"

• The White Rabbit pictured on the card that Jefferson puts on Paige's bike is wearing a red waistcoat and a yellow shirt (in the novel, the character is merely described as wearing a waistcoat),[37] and is carrying a dark blue umbrella, just like his Disney counterpart. (Alice in Wonderland, 1951)
Snow White falls to the ground in the same fashion in Disney's 1937 film after taking a bite of the poisoned apple. The same thing happens to her grandson Henry when he takes a bite of the poisoned apple turnover. (Snow White and the Seven Dwarfs, 1937)


"A Land Without Magic"

Maleficent is wearing a purple dress. In the animated film, her outfit is black and purple. Her hair ornament is reminiscent of the horns on her headgear in the animated film. (Sleeping Beauty, 1959)
Maleficent transforms into a fire breathing dragon. (Sleeping Beauty, 1959)
Snow White is awakened by a kiss from Prince Charming. (This element was added for the Disney film and does not originate in the fairytale. In the first edition of the "Snow White" fairytale from 1812, the apple is dislodged from Snow White's throat when one of the prince's servants, angry for having to carry the dead Snow White's coffin wherever the prince goes, strikes the sleeping princess. Beginning with the second edition from 1819, the apple dislodges when a servant accidentally stumbles while carrying the coffin to the prince's castle.[1]) (Snow White and the Seven Dwarfs, 1937)
Emma throws the sword, directly hitting the dragon in the heart, just as Prince Phillip did in Disney's Sleeping Beauty. (Sleeping Beauty, 1959)


Season Two

Season Two in General

• During her stay at the hospital from "In the Name of the Brother" to "Lacey", Belle is wearing a yellow hospital gown in reference to her ball dress from Disney's Beauty and the Beast. (Beauty and the Beast, 1991)


"Broken"

See this list for special references introduced in this episode, which apply to the show in general.
Prince Phillip cuts down thorns to get to the sleeping Aurora (in the fairytale, the thorns separate themselves and make a path for the prince). ((Sleeping Beauty, 1959)
• Prince Phillip awakens Aurora from the sleeping curse with true love's kiss, just like in the Disney film. (In the Brothers Grimm version of the fairytale, the prince stoops down and kisses the princess just as the curse breaks. This was modified for the Disney film, where the prince actually awakens the princess with a kiss, which breaks the spell and wakes everyone in the palace.) (Sleeping Beauty, 1959)
• When Emma and her parents pay Mr. Gold a visit, he is brewing tea for himself and Belle, a reference to the scene where Chip and Mrs. Potts bring Belle some tea in the Disney film. The tea set with the cups, teapot, lidded sugar bowl and teaspoon mirror the scene in the movie, where Chip and Mrs. Potts are accompanied by a living, lidded sugar bowl which uses a spoon to put sugar in Belle's tea. (Beauty and the Beast, 1991)
• When Belle leaves the pawnshop, a candelabra similar to Lumiere from Beauty and the Beast[38] is sitting on a shelf by the door. (Beauty and the Beast, 1991)


"We Are Both"

See this list for special references introduced in this episode, which apply to the show in general.
Leroy says, "It's off to work we go", from the song "Heigh-Ho". (Snow White and the Seven Dwarfs, 1937)
• In Mr. Gold's shop, there is an African mask, which is an allusion to the Disney film.[39] (The Lion King, 1994)
Cora tells Regina, "You're stuck with me forever, darling, because I'm your mother, and I know best." The line is a reference to the song "Mother Knows Best". (Tangled, 2010)


"Lady of the Lake"

Mulan tells Emma and Mary Margaret, "You might survive", which is a line from the song "I'll Make a Man Out of You". It goes "Time is racing toward us, till the Huns arrive / Heed my every order, and you might survive". (Mulan, 1998)


"The Crocodile"

See this list for special references introduced in this episode, which apply to the show in general.
• The teapot sitting in the corner of Mr. Gold's kitchen counter is a reference to Mrs. Potts from Beauty and the Beast.[26] (Beauty and the Beast, 1991)
• Mr. Gold offers Belle some breakfast, but she declines. After their fight, Gold knocks at Belle's door, telling her to at least come and eat something. Similarly, in the Disney film, when the Beast makes Belle eat dinner with him, she refuses, claiming to not be hungry; prompting him to storm over to Belle's room and bang on the door, ordering her to come out to have dinner with him. (Beauty and the Beast, 1991)
• Belle enjoys drinking iced tea at Granny's Diner and says that she's never had it iced before, a reference to the scene where the living teaset bring Belle some tea in the movie. (Beauty and the Beast, 1991)
• Mr. Gold gives Belle a library to try to regain her affections, similar to what the Beast does in the Disney film. (Beauty and the Beast, 1991)


"The Doctor "

Rumplestiltskin's witch-in-training replacement, Trish, bears a resemblance to Esmeralda. (Hunchback of Notre Dame, 1996)


"Tallahassee "

• When Henry wakes up from the bad dream, a bird figurine similar to the bluebirds that Snow White interacts with in the Disney film, is sitting on Mary Margaret's nightstand. (Snow White and the Seven Dwarfs, 1937)


"Child of the Moon"

Leroy and his fellow dwarves mine for diamonds, just like in the Disney film (in the "Snow White" fairytale, they mine for gold, or gold and something else, depending on the exact edition[34]). (Snow White and the Seven Dwarfs, 1937)
Billy's Enchanted Forest counterpart is Cinderella's household mouse, Gus. (Cinderella, 1950)
• Billy states that he, as Gus, liked cheese. In the animated film, Gus is also fond of cheese. (Cinderella, 1950)


"Into the Deep"

Belle has a glass of iced tea in front of her at Granny's Diner,[40] a modern reference to the scene where the living teaset bring Belle some tea in the Disney film. (Beauty and the Beast, 1991)
Cora and Mary Margaret interact with a raven, just like the Evil Queen does in the Disney film. (Snow White and the Seven Dwarfs, 1937)


"Queen of Hearts"

• The Queen of Hearts tells Hook to call her "your majesty", a reference to the scene where the Queen of Hearts says to Alice, "Open your mouth a little wider, and always say “yes, your majesty”!" (Alice in Wonderland, 1951)
• The mask Cora holds[41] resembles the baton the Queen of Hearts carries in the Disney film. (Alice in Wonderland, 1951)
Regina and Mr. Gold find the diamonds, mined by the dwarves in "The Cricket Game", a reference to the animated Disney film, where the seven dwarves mine for diamonds (in the "Snow White" fairytale, they mine for gold, or gold and something else, depending on the exact edition[34]). (Snow White and the Seven Dwarfs, 1937)


"The Cricket Game"

• In the opening scene, Hook is shown from behind, standing on a yard while holding on to it with his left appendage, and looking at the town while the camera zooms in on him. The camera then zooms in on his face as his hair is blowing in the wind. Hook then grabs a rope that was next to the mast, hangs on to it and jumps to the deck below, followed by a close-up of his feet as he steps onto the dock. This is exactly the same as Captain Jack Sparrow's introduction in Pirates of the Caribbean (note that in the Disney film; there is a whole segment between the shot where Jack jumps and the shot where he steps onto the dock; on Once Upon a Time, it cuts directly to the dock). (Pirates of the Caribbean: The Curse of the Black Pearl, 2003)



"The Outsider"

Archie's tombstone reads "Archibald Hopper – Friend and conscience", a reference to Disney's Pinocchio, where Archie's counterpart Jiminy Cricket serves as a friend and conscience to Pinocchio. Similarly, Mary Margaret describes Archie as someone who would remind them be their best selves, do the right thing and always fight for what they believe in; another reference to the Disney character. (Pinocchio, 1940)
• A bird figurine similar to a bluebird is sitting on Mary Margaret's nightstand, a reference to the bluebirds that Snow White interacts with in the Disney film. (Snow White and the Seven Dwarfs, 1937)
Mulan says that she served in the emperor's army, a reference to Disney's Mulan (in the Ballad of Mulan, the titular character joins the Khan's army). (Mulan, 1998)
• Mulan tells Belle that she found something worth fighting for, a reference to the the Disney song "A Girl Worth Fighting For". (Mulan, 1998)
• Mulan lives in a Chinese village, just like in the Disney film (in the Ballad of Mulan, the area where the titular character lives is merely referred to as her "home"). (Mulan, 1998)


"In the Name of the Brother"

See this list for special references introduced in this episode, which apply to the season in general.
• The ringtone on Greg's mobile phone is the Star Wars theme. The episode was broadcast three months after Disney purchased the franchise in October 2012.[42] (Star Wars franchise)
Leroy mentions the movie Splash as an example of how magical beings discovered in the real world are likely to be "studied to death". (Splash, 1984)


"Tiny"

Leroy and the other dwarves whistle the melody of "Heigh-Ho". (Snow White and the Seven Dwarfs, 1937)


"The Miller's Daughter"

• The segment where Cora holds out her newborn daughter Regina in front of the court is a reference to scene where Simba is presented to the kingdom as the future king in The Lion King.[43] (The Lion King, 1994)


"Welcome to Storybrooke"

Kurt and Owen's last name is Flynn, a reference to Kevin and Sam Flynn[44] from the science fiction films Tron and its 2010 sequel Tron Legacy, respectively. Show creators Adam Horowitz and Edward Kitsis wrote the screenplay for the sequel. (Tron, 1982, Tron: Legacy, 2010)
• Owen has a Return of the Jedi sleeping bag,[44] and mentions Luke Skywalker and Darth Vader from the Star Wars movies. He also makes a reference to lightsabers. (Star Wars franchise)
• A bench outside the Marine Garage features an advertisement for computers with the ENCOM logo.[44] (Tron, 1982)
• When Regina visits the pawnshop, Gold is polishing a teakettle, a reference to Mrs. Potts.[44] (Beauty and the Beast, 1991)
Emma mentions how magic laws are not capable of bringing back the dead or making someone love another, a reference to the wish rules from Disney's Aladdin. ((Aladdin, 1992)
• A bird figurine similar to a bluebird is sitting on Mary Margaret's nightstand, a reference to the bluebirds that Snow White interacts with in the Disney film. (Snow White and the Seven Dwarfs, 1937)


"Selfless, Brave and True"

• The pendant on August's necklace is a wooden carving of Monstro the whale. (Pinocchio, 1940)
• The Dragon states that the string on August's necklace is the one that Geppetto used to animate August (Pinocchio) as a freshly carved puppet, adding "In a way, it first gave you life". This is a reference to the scene where Disney's Geppetto carves the lifeless Pinocchio puppet and proceeds to play around with it by pulling its strings. (In the novel, the puppet moves on its own accord from the start.) (Pinocchio, 1940)
• As August lies on the ground in agony, there is a honey neon sign for a bar called "Winnie's Pub". (Winnie the Pooh, 2011)


"Lacey"

• In the Enchanted Forest, Belle wears a similar dress to the one in the ballroom scene in the Disney film. (Beauty and the Beast, 1991)
Mr. Gold orders ice tea for himself and Lacey at Granny's Diner, a modern reference to the scene where the living teaset bring Belle some tea in the movie. (Beauty and the Beast, 1991)
Rumplestiltskin shows Belle the library in his home, similar to what the Beast did in the Disney film. (Beauty and the Beast, 1991)


"Second Star to the Right"

See this list for special references introduced in this episode, which apply to the show in general.
John is carrying a black umbrella, just like in the Disney film. (Peter Pan, 1953)
Michael carries a teddy bear near-identical to the one he has in the Disney film. (Peter Pan, 1953)
• The time on Big Ben is 8:15, the same time that is shown in the Disney film. (Peter Pan, 1953)


"And Straight On 'Til Morning"

Hook says to Baelfire, "It's a pirate's life for you", a reference to the song "Yo Ho (A Pirate's Life for Me)" from Disney's Pirates of the Caribbean. (Pirates of the Caribbean franchise)
Sneezy's drinking stein is similar to the one seen in the dwarves' cottage in the Disney film. (Snow White and the Seven Dwarfs, 1937)
Leroy and the other dwarves whistle the melody of "Heigh-Ho". (Snow White and the Seven Dwarfs, 1937)


Season Three

"The Heart of the Truest Believer"

Neal references Mulan to a Disney film of the same name. (Mulan, 1998)
David saves Emma from drowning by tying a rope around himself, which is attached to the rigging; jumping into the water, grabbing Emma, and being hoisted on board by three other crew members. This mirrors the scene where John Smith saves Thomas from drowning in Disney's Pocahontas. (Pocahontas, 1995)

(Note that the order of the shots from Pocahontas is slightly different in the actual movie.)


"Lost Girl"

Snow White is awakened by a kiss from Prince Charming. (This element was added for the Disney film and does not originate in the fairytale. In the first edition of the "Snow White" fairytale from 1812, the apple is dislodged from Snow White's throat when one of the prince's servants, angry for having to carry the dead Snow White's coffin wherever the prince goes, strikes the sleeping princess. Beginning with the second edition from 1819, the apple dislodges when a servant accidentally stumbles while carrying the coffin to the prince's castle.[1]) (Snow White and the Seven Dwarfs, 1937)
Emma notes Captain Hook's appearance in the animated film as sporting a "waxed mustache and a perm". (Peter Pan, 1953)
Pan's map of Neverland is highly reminiscent of the map from the animated film. (Peter Pan, 1953)
• The close-up where Hook touches the map with his grapple hook mirrors a segment from the animated movie. (Peter Pan, 1953)


"Quite a Common Fairy"

See this list for special references introduced in this episode, which apply to the show in general.
• The title card features Tinker Bell lighting up the title with her magic, a reference to what the Disney animated version of the character does for the company's logo at the beginning of several of its home video releases.
• The map of Neverland is highly reminiscent of the map from the animated film. (Peter Pan, 1953)


"Nasty Habits"

• The Sheriff of Hamelin is dressed similar to the Mayor of Hamelin in Silly Symphonies. (The Pied Piper, 1933)


"Ariel"

See this list for special references introduced in this episode, which apply to the show in general.
• In the title card, Ariel is sitting on a rock, similar to how Disney's Ariel sits on a rock in the movie during the musical number "Part of Your World". (The Little Mermaid, 1989)
• The Under the Sea Celebration is a reference to the song "Under the Sea" from the movie. (The Little Mermaid, 1989)
• Ariel likes to collect random human objects. (The Little Mermaid, 1989)
• Ariel keeps the human objects she collects in a bag. (The Little Mermaid, 1989)
• Ariel learns what a fork is. (The Little Mermaid, 1989)
• Both Ariel and Eric mention a ship wreck where they first met (in the fairytale, the prince is completely unconscious when the little mermaid rescues him and unlike Eric, he does not remember the incident afterward). (The Little Mermaid, 1989)
• Eric states one of the places he will be traveling to is Agrabah, the setting of Disney's Aladdin. (Aladdin, 1992)
• The form the Evil Queen takes when she masquerades as Ursula is based on the Disney version of the character. (The Little Mermaid, 1989)
• While masquerading as Ursula, Regina says to Ariel, "My dear sweet child", which are the spoken words at the start of the song "Poor Unfortunate Souls" sung by Ursula in the Disney film. (The Little Mermaid, 1989)
• The Evil Queen says,"You can be part of Eric's world", alluding to the Disney film song "Part of Your World". (The Little Mermaid, 1989)
Regina mentions the evil munchkins' dirt road. (Oz the Great and Powerful, 2013)
Snow White's ball dress has small Mickey Mouse faces on it.[45] (Steamboat Willie, 1928)
• The real Ursula takes the form of a cecaelia, just like the Disney version of the character (in Hans Christian Andersen's fairytale, it is never described what the sea witch looks like). (The Little Mermaid, 1989)


"Dark Hollow"

See this list for special references introduced in this episode, which apply to the show in general.
Leroy says, "No time for whistling, boys", alluding to the Disney song "Whistle While You Work". (Snow White and the Seven Dwarfs, 1937)
Keychain is dressed in pink and has a teddy bear on his rear view mirror,[46] alluding to Disney version of Michael Darling. (Peter Pan, 1953)
Ariel is fascinated by random human objects, just like in the animated film. (The Little Mermaid, 1989)
• While in the Mr. Gold's shop, Ariel says, "Look at this stuff", which are the first words to the Disney song "Part of Your World". It opens with "Look at this stuff / Isn't it neat? / Wouldn't you think my collection's complete?" (The Little Mermaid, 1989)
• Ariel is fascinated by a corkscrew she finds in Mr. Gold's pawnshop. In the animated movie, the character has a box full of corkscrews. (The Little Mermaid, 1989)


"Save Henry"

Regina says to Henry, "Oh, I know that look. That's five hours of Space Paranoids and too much pizza."; a reference to the game Space Paranoids from Tron. (Tron, 1982)


"Going Home"

• A Bambi plush toy is sitting on the floor in Emma's nursery.[47] (Bambi, 1942)
• It is also a reference to the roe deer that Emma's mother Snow White interacts with in Snow White and the Seven Dwarfs. (Snow White and the Seven Dwarfs, 1937)