FANDOM


 
(26 révisions intermédiaires par 11 utilisateurs sont masquées)
Ligne 1 : Ligne 1 :
 
{{Infobox Œuvre
 
{{Infobox Œuvre
|Nom=''De l'Autre Côté du Miroir''
+
|Nom=''De l'Autre Côté du Miroir''
|Image=
+
|Image=4x04 De l'Autre Côté du Miroir page livre roman conte dessin illustration Anastasia Reine Rouge.png
|Introduit={{ep|W1x01}}
+
|saison=W1|Introduit={{ep|W1x01}}
 
|Origine=Angleterre
 
|Origine=Angleterre
 
|Écrit=Lewis Caroll
 
|Écrit=Lewis Caroll
 
|Année=1871
 
|Année=1871
|Personnages liés=[[Alice]]<br/>''[[Anastasia|Reine Rouge]]''<br/>Le ''[[Roi Rouge]]''<br/>Le [[Jabberwocky]]<br/>Les [[Mome Raths]]<br/>[[Tweedledee]]<br/>[[Tweedledum]]<br/>Le [[Charpentier]]<br/>Le [[Chevalier Blanc|Cavalier Blanc]]<br/>Le ''[[Will Scarlet|Roi Blanc]]''<br/>[[Bandersnatch]]
+
|Personnages liés=[[Alice]] / [[Alice (Saison 7)|Alice]]<br/>La ''[[Anastasia|Reine Rouge]]''<br/>Le ''[[Roi Rouge]]''<br/>Le [[Jabberwocky]]<br/>Les [[Mome Raths]]<br/>[[Tweedledee]]<br/>[[Tweedledum]]<br/>Le [[Charpentier]]<br/>Le [[Chevalier Blanc|Cavalier Blanc]]<br/>Le ''[[Will Scarlet|Roi Blanc]]''<br/>La ''[[Anastasia|Reine Blanche]]''<br/>[[Bandersnatch]]
 
}}
 
}}
   
'''''De l'Autre Côté du Miroir''''' (''Through the Looking-Glass, and What Alice Found There'') est un roman écrit par Lewis Carroll en 1871, qui fait suite aux ''[[Alice au Pays des Merveilles (roman)|Aventures d'Alice au Pays des Merveilles]]''.
+
'''''Ce qu'Alice Trouva De l'Autre Côté du Miroir''''' ou '''''De l'Autre Côté du Miroir''''' (''Through the Looking-Glass, and What Alice Found There'') est un roman écrit par Lewis Carroll en 1871, qui fait suite aux ''[[Alice au Pays des Merveilles (roman)|Aventures d'Alice au Pays des Merveilles]]''.
   
En France, ce roman a été publié pour la première fois en 1931 sous le titre ''La Traversée du Miroir''. Le titre sera changé en ''De l'Autre Côté du Miroir'' lors de la réédition de 1938.
+
En France, ce roman a été publié pour la première fois en 1931 sous le titre ''La Traversée du Miroir''. Le titre sera changé en ''De l'Autre Côté du Miroir'' lors de la réédition de 1938.
   
==Adaptation dans la série==
+
==Résumé==
* [[Tweedledee]] et [[Tweedledum]] sont frères. Ils servent la ''[[Anastasia|Reine Rouge]]''. Tweedledee trahit sa souveraine pour [[Jafar]].
+
'''Chapitre Un – ''La Maison du Miroir'' :''' Alice joue avec les petits blanc et noir de sa chatte Dinah, Perce-Neige et Kitty, lorsqu'elle se demande à quoi ressemblerait le monde de l'autre côté d'un miroir. Grimpant sur le manteau de cheminée, elle découvre avec surprise après tâtonnement qu'elle est capable de franchir la glace vers un monde alternatif. Dans cette version réfléchie de sa propre maison, elle découvre un livre de poésie, le ''Jabberwocky'', dont les caractères imprimés sont inversés de sorte à être lisibles devant le miroir. Les pièces d'échecs ont aussi pris vie tout en gardant leur taille.
* Le [[Charpentier]] ne se promène pas avec le Morse et meurt transformé en arbre dans le [[Boro Grove]].
+
* Le ''[[Roi Rouge]]'' ne dort pas et ne ronfle pas comme dans le roman. Il épouse Anastasia et se fait assassiner par [[Cora]].
+
'''Chapitre Deux – ''Le Jardin des Fleurs Vivantes'' :''' En quittant la maison après une froide nuit enneigée, Alice pénètre dans un jardin printanier où les fleurs parlent d'elle comme d'une plante capable de bouger. Plus loin, elle rencontre la ''[[Anastasia|Reine Rouge]]'', une pièce d'échecs de taille humaine impressionnant Alice par sa rapidité.
* Le [[Jabberwocky]] n'est pas un dragon mais une créature humaine capable de lire et de se nourrir des peurs.
+
** Dans le roman, dans le poème sur le ''Jabberwocky'', la [[lame Vorpaline]] est mentionnée pour vaincre la créature. Dans la [[Once Upon a Time in Wonderland|série]], l'épée est le seul objet capable de retenir la créature.
+
'''Chapitre Trois ''Insectes du Miroir'' :'''
* Les [[Mome Raths]] sont de gros chiens noirs aux dents acérées et aux yeux rouges luisants.
+
* Le [[Bandersnatch]] est une dangereuse créature qui s'en prend à [[Alice]] à plusieurs reprises.
+
'''Chapitre Quatre ''Bonnet Blanc et Blanc Bonnet'' :'''
* La ''Reine Rouge'' devient la ''Reine Blanche'' et devient amie avec Alice.
+
* Le [[Chevalier Blanc]] garde des portes. Il ne se bat pas contre le Cavalier Rouge et ne vient pas en aide à Alice.
+
'''Chapitre Cinq ''Laine et Eau'' :'''
  +
  +
'''Chapitre Six – ''Le Gros Coco'' :'''
  +
  +
'''Chapitre Sept – ''Le Lion et la Licorne'' :'''
  +
  +
'''Chapitre Huit – ''« C'est de mon invention »'' :'''
  +
  +
'''Chapitre Neuf – ''La Reine Alice'' :'''
  +
  +
'''Chapitre Dix – ''Secouement'' :'''
  +
  +
'''Chapitre Onze – ''Réveil…'' :'''
  +
  +
'''Chapitre Douze – ''Qui a rêvé ?'' :'''
  +
<!-- Chapter Three – Looking-Glass Insects: The Red Queen reveals to Alice that the entire countryside is laid out in squares, like a gigantic chessboard, and offers to make Alice a queen if she can move all the way to the eighth rank/row in a chess match. This is a reference to the chess rule of Promotion. Alice is placed in the second rank as one of the White Queen's pawns, and begins her journey across the chessboard by boarding a train that literally jumps over the third row and directly into the fourth rank, thus acting on the rule that pawns can advance two spaces on their first move.
  +
  +
Chapter Four – Tweedledum and Tweedledee: She then meets the fat twin brothers Tweedledum and Tweedledee, who she knows from the famous nursery rhyme. After reciting the long poem "The Walrus and the Carpenter", the Tweedles draw Alice's attention to the Red King—loudly snoring away under a nearby tree—and maliciously provoke her with idle philosophical banter that she exists only as an imaginary figure in the Red King's dreams (thereby implying that she will cease to exist the instant he wakes up). Finally, the brothers begin acting out their nursery-rhyme by suiting up for battle, only to be frightened away by an enormous crow, as the nursery rhyme about them predicts.
  +
  +
Chapter Five – Wool and Water: Alice next meets the White Queen, who is very absent-minded but boasts of (and demonstrates) her ability to remember future events before they have happened. Alice and the White Queen advance into the chessboard's fifth rank by crossing over a brook together, but at the very moment of the crossing, the Queen transforms into a talking Sheep in a small shop. Alice soon finds herself struggling to handle the oars of a small rowboat, where the Sheep annoys her with (seemingly) nonsensical shouting about "crabs" and "feathers". Unknown to Alice, these are standard terms in the jargon of rowing. Thus (for a change) the Queen/Sheep was speaking in a perfectly logical and meaningful way.
  +
Chapter Six – Humpty Dumpty: After crossing yet another brook into the sixth rank, Alice immediately encounters Humpty Dumpty, who, besides celebrating his unbirthday, provides his own translation of the strange terms in "Jabberwocky". In the process, he introduces Alice (and the reader) to the concept of portmanteau words, before his inevitable fall.
  +
Chapter Seven – The Lion and the Unicorn: "All the king's horses and all the king's men" come to Humpty Dumpty's assistance, and are accompanied by the White King, along with the Lion and the Unicorn, who again proceed to act out a nursery rhyme by fighting with each other. In this chapter, the March Hare and Hatter of the first book make a brief re-appearance in the guise of "Anglo-Saxon messengers" called "Haigha" and "Hatta" (i.e. "Hare" and "Hatter"—these names are the only hint given as to their identities other than John Tenniel's illustrations).
  +
Chapter Eight – “It's my own Invention”: Upon leaving the Lion and Unicorn to their fight, Alice reaches the seventh rank by crossing another brook into the forested territory of the Red Knight, who is intent on capturing the "white pawn"—who is Alice—until the White Knight comes to her rescue. Escorting her through the forest towards the final brook-crossing, the Knight recites a long poem of his own composition called Haddocks' Eyes, and repeatedly falls off his horse. His clumsiness is a reference to the "eccentric" L-shaped movements of chess knights, and may also be interpreted as a self-deprecating joke about Lewis Carroll's own physical awkwardness and stammering in real life.
  +
Chapter Nine – Queen Alice: Bidding farewell to the White Knight, Alice steps across the last brook, and is automatically crowned a queen, with the crown materialising abruptly on her head. She soon finds herself in the company of both the White and Red Queens, who relentlessly confound Alice by using word play to thwart her attempts at logical discussion. They then invite one another to a party that will be hosted by the newly crowned Alice—of which Alice herself had no prior knowledge.
  +
Chapter Ten – Shaking: Alice arrives and seats herself at her own party, which quickly turns to a chaotic uproar—much like the ending of the first book. Alice finally grabs the Red Queen, believing her to be responsible for all the day's nonsense, and begins shaking her violently with all her might. By thus "capturing" the Red Queen, Alice unknowingly puts the Red King (who has remained stationary throughout the book) into checkmate, and thus is allowed to wake up.
  +
Chapter Eleven – Waking: Alice suddenly awakes in her armchair to find herself holding the black kitten, who she deduces to have been the Red Queen all along, with the white kitten having been the White Queen.
  +
Chapter Twelve – Which dreamed it?: The story ends with Alice recalling the speculation of the Tweedle brothers, that everything may have, in fact, been a dream of the Red King, and that Alice might herself be no more than a figment of his imagination. One final poem is inserted by the author as a sort of epilogue which suggests that life itself is but a dream. -->
  +
  +
==Adaptation dans la série==
  +
* [[Tweedledee]] et [[Tweedledum]] sont frères. Ils servent la ''[[Anastasia|Reine Rouge]]''. Tweedledee trahit sa souveraine pour [[Jafar]].
  +
* Le [[Charpentier]] ne se promène pas avec le Morse et meurt transformé en arbre dans le [[Boro Grove]].
  +
* Le ''[[Roi Rouge]]'' ne dort pas et ne ronfle pas comme dans le roman. Il épouse Anastasia et se fait assassiner par [[Cora]].
  +
* Le [[Jabberwocky]] n'est pas un dragon mais une créature humaine capable de lire et de se nourrir des peurs.
  +
** Dans le roman, dans le poème sur le ''Jabberwocky'', la [[lame Vorpaline]] est mentionnée pour vaincre la créature. Dans la [[Once Upon a Time in Wonderland|série]], l'épée est le seul objet capable de retenir la créature.
  +
* Les [[Mome Raths]] sont de gros chiens noirs aux dents acérées et aux yeux rouges luisants.
  +
* Le [[Bandersnatch]] est une dangereuse créature qui s'en prend à [[Alice]] à plusieurs reprises.
  +
* La ''Reine Rouge'' devient la ''Reine Blanche'' et devient amie avec Alice.
  +
* Le ''Roi Blanc'' est [[Will Scarlet]], un voleur et ancien ''[[Joyeux Compagnons|Joyeux Compagnon]]'' de [[Robin de Locksley|Robin des Bois]] et ancien Valet de Cœur de la ''Reine de Cœur''.
  +
* Le [[Chevalier Blanc]] garde des portes. Il ne se bat pas contre le Cavalier Rouge et ne vient pas en aide à Alice.
  +
<gallery position=center spacing=small widths=200 captionalign=center>
  +
W1x05 Roi Reine Anastasia Rouge mains saluts peuple Pays des Merveilles balcon tour château palais têtes profil sourires.png|<small>Le ''[[Roi Rouge|Roi]]'' et la ''[[Anastasia|Reine Rouges]]'', interprétés par [[Garwin Sanford]] et [[Emma Rigby]]. {{référence|W1x05}}</small>
  +
W1x09 Jabberwocky prisonnière lame Vorpaline.png|Le [[Jabberwocky]], interprété par [[Peta Sergeant]]. {{référence|W1x09}}
  +
W1x03 Bandersnatch attaque gueule défenses Grendel.png|Le [[Bandersnatch]]. {{référence|W1x03}}
  +
</gallery>
   
 
==Autres adaptations==
 
==Autres adaptations==
 
===Cinéma===
 
===Cinéma===
{{DISPLAYTITLE|''De l'Autre Côté du Miroir''}}
+
* 1936 – ''Thru the Mirror'', court métrage de [[Disney|Mickey Mouse]] ;
{{Wikipedia|De l'autre côté du miroir}}
+
* 2016 – ''[[Alice au Pays des Merveilles (Disney)#Alice de l'Autre Côté du Miroir|Alice de l'Autre Côté du Miroir]]'', [[portail:Films Disney#Live|film]] de James Bobin avec Mia Wasikowska, Johnny Depp et Helena Bonham Carter.
  +
<gallery position=center spacing=small widths=200 captionalign=center>
  +
Alice de l'Autre Côté du Miroir film Disney 2016 pièces d'échecs pions roi reines soldats cheval cavalier noires surprise volte-face.png|<small>Alice dans le [[portail:Films Disney#Live|film]] [[Disney]] ''[[Alice au Pays des Merveilles (Disney)#Alice de l'Autre Côté du Miroir|Alice de l'Autre Côté du Miroir]]'' de 2016 par James Bobin.</small>
  +
</gallery>
  +
  +
==Références==
  +
<references/>
  +
{{Wikipedia|De l'autre côté du miroir}}
  +
{{DISPLAYTITLE:''De l'Autre Côté du Miroir''}}
 
[[en:Through the Looking-Glass]]
 
[[en:Through the Looking-Glass]]
 
[[Catégorie:Contes]]
 
[[Catégorie:Contes]]
 
[[Catégorie:Romans]]
 
[[Catégorie:Romans]]
  +
[[Catégorie:Œuvres intradiégétiques]]

Version actuelle en date du avril 29, 2020 à 11:03

Ce qu'Alice Trouva De l'Autre Côté du Miroir ou De l'Autre Côté du Miroir (Through the Looking-Glass, and What Alice Found There) est un roman écrit par Lewis Carroll en 1871, qui fait suite aux Aventures d'Alice au Pays des Merveilles.

En France, ce roman a été publié pour la première fois en 1931 sous le titre La Traversée du Miroir. Le titre sera changé en De l'Autre Côté du Miroir lors de la réédition de 1938.

RésuméModifier

Chapitre Un – La Maison du Miroir : Alice joue avec les petits blanc et noir de sa chatte Dinah, Perce-Neige et Kitty, lorsqu'elle se demande à quoi ressemblerait le monde de l'autre côté d'un miroir. Grimpant sur le manteau de cheminée, elle découvre avec surprise après tâtonnement qu'elle est capable de franchir la glace vers un monde alternatif. Dans cette version réfléchie de sa propre maison, elle découvre un livre de poésie, le Jabberwocky, dont les caractères imprimés sont inversés de sorte à être lisibles devant le miroir. Les pièces d'échecs ont aussi pris vie tout en gardant leur taille.

Chapitre Deux – Le Jardin des Fleurs Vivantes : En quittant la maison après une froide nuit enneigée, Alice pénètre dans un jardin printanier où les fleurs parlent d'elle comme d'une plante capable de bouger. Plus loin, elle rencontre la Reine Rouge, une pièce d'échecs de taille humaine impressionnant Alice par sa rapidité.

Chapitre Trois – Insectes du Miroir :

Chapitre Quatre – Bonnet Blanc et Blanc Bonnet :

Chapitre Cinq – Laine et Eau :

Chapitre Six – Le Gros Coco :

Chapitre Sept – Le Lion et la Licorne :

Chapitre Huit – « C'est de mon invention » :

Chapitre Neuf – La Reine Alice :

Chapitre Dix – Secouement :

Chapitre Onze – Réveil… :

Chapitre Douze – Qui a rêvé ? :

Adaptation dans la sérieModifier

  • Tweedledee et Tweedledum sont frères. Ils servent la Reine Rouge. Tweedledee trahit sa souveraine pour Jafar.
  • Le Charpentier ne se promène pas avec le Morse et meurt transformé en arbre dans le Boro Grove.
  • Le Roi Rouge ne dort pas et ne ronfle pas comme dans le roman. Il épouse Anastasia et se fait assassiner par Cora.
  • Le Jabberwocky n'est pas un dragon mais une créature humaine capable de lire et de se nourrir des peurs.
    • Dans le roman, dans le poème sur le Jabberwocky, la lame Vorpaline est mentionnée pour vaincre la créature. Dans la série, l'épée est le seul objet capable de retenir la créature.
  • Les Mome Raths sont de gros chiens noirs aux dents acérées et aux yeux rouges luisants.
  • Le Bandersnatch est une dangereuse créature qui s'en prend à Alice à plusieurs reprises.
  • La Reine Rouge devient la Reine Blanche et devient amie avec Alice.
  • Le Roi Blanc est Will Scarlet, un voleur et ancien Joyeux Compagnon de Robin des Bois et ancien Valet de Cœur de la Reine de Cœur.
  • Le Chevalier Blanc garde des portes. Il ne se bat pas contre le Cavalier Rouge et ne vient pas en aide à Alice.

Autres adaptationsModifier

CinémaModifier

RéférencesModifier

Cette page utilise du contenu sous licence Creative Commons de Wikipedia (voir les auteurs).
Sauf mention contraire, le contenu de la communauté est disponible sous licence CC-BY-SA .